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5.6%, Draft

Appearance: Orange with a red tint.
Aroma: Slightly spicy with big citrus notes.
Taste: Bitter and earthy hops. Crisp.
Mouthfeel: Lighter body and a clean finish.

One taste of Falling Down’s Ninja Chicken and it’s easy to see why it’s one of their best sellers. This American pale ale has a distinguishable IPA-feel with the amount of hops present. Slightly malty with a big hop profile. This beer is a great go-to with an outstanding name. Catch it on tap at the brewpub if you can.

5.6% ABV, Bottle

Appearance: Clear orange-gold with a small to medium head.
Aroma: A bit of spice along with some hops.
Taste: Wheat, malt, bread and some subtle hops that come through toward the finish.
Mouthfeel: Light to medium bodied.

New Holland’s Paleooza was the brewery’s first bottled beer — ever. And now it’s back. Reintroduced just this year, Paleooza contains subtle flavors of wheat, malt, bread and hops, creating a pleasant and easy-going brew. All in all, Paleooza is a great gateway beer, introducing beer newbies to pale ales — and it’s an enjoyable one at that.

5.9% ABV, Bottle

Appearance: Cloudy orange with a small head. Some decent lacing.
Aroma: Floral, with some hops and malt smell.
Taste: Lots of floral flavors, with some moderate hops, creating a slight bitterness. Some malt and bread-like qualities too.
Mouthfeel: Medium bodied.

Greenbush’s Closure is one of the brewery’s first bottle releases, and it comes in with a unique style for a pale ale. Floral qualities blend this beer well with the typical hop-forward front, making for a well-balanced pale ale with some interesting tastes.

Can

Appearance: Golden tone, pours with a very thin head that leaves a decent lacing, with lots of bubbling carbonation.
Aroma: Citrus, lemon and a mild hops scent with a slight roastiness.
Taste: Citrus up front that slowly trails into a bitterness but ends back on a citrus note. A hint of floral flavoring.
Mouthfeel: Crisp medium body with a creaminess that lingers. The brew is balanced by its medium carbonation.

I thought November Gale Pale Ale would be much more bitter, but I’m not complaining (as I’m not hophead). This is a refreshing beer that borders between traditional and pale ale. This definitely fits the Keweenaw profile and it’s worth keeping in any good beer fridge.

6.3% ABV, Draft

Appearance: Light to medium amber in color, low carbonation with virtually no head or lacing.
Aroma: Mild citrus and tropical fruit over a slightly grainy note.
Taste: Toasty malt forward, followed by fruity and resiny hop flavors.
Mouthfeel: Medium bodied, a bit dry on the palate with a strong but not overwhelmingly bitter finish.

KUA stands for Kalamazoo Urban Assault, which I guess has to do with X-TREME hops or something, I’m not really sure. Name aside, it’s not an X-TREME beer at all but rather a nicely balanced pale ale that melds a slightly toasty, slightly sweet malt profile with a good dollop of citrus and resiny hops. More carbonation would be nice, though I attribute the lack of foam to a kegging issue.

COMSTOCK — In October, Bell’s Pale Ale will no longer be Bell’s Pale Ale.

The company announced Monday it is changing the name of the beer to Bell’s Midwestern Pale Ale. With the name change comes a slight recipe alteration.

Now incorporated into the brewing process will be barley from Bell’s Farm in Shepard, Mich., in an effort to build a stronger connection to the state.

“This is a relatively minor change to the recipe and people won’t notice anything different, however it’s part of a much larger picture,” Marketing Director Laura Bell said in a statement.

The newly-named brew will start shipping in mid-October.

The barely from the farm already is used in two other Bell’s beers, Christmas Ale and Harvest Ale. The Harvest Ale also uses Michigan-grown hops.

The newly named beer also will have a new label — a painting of Bell’s Farm by Kalamazoo artist Conrad Kaufman.

COMSTOCK — In October, Bell’s Pale Ale will no longer be Bell’s Pale Ale.
The company announced Monday it is changing the name of the beer to Bell’s Midwestern Pale Ale. With the name change comes a slight recipe alteration.
Now incorporated into the brewing process will be barley from Bell’s Farm in Shepard, Mich., in an effort to build a stronger connection to the state.
“This is a relatively minor change to the recipe and people won’t notice anything different, however it’s part of a much larger picture,” Marketing Director Laura Bell said in a statement.
The newly-named brew will start shipping in mid-October.
The barely from the farm already is used in two other Bell’s beers, Christmas Ale and Harvest Ale. The Harvest Ale also uses Michigan-grown hops.
The newly named beer also will have a new label — a painting of Bell’s Farm by Kalamazoo artist Conrad Kaufman.

5.2% ABV, Bottle

Appearance: Dark copper with a small head.
Aroma: Minor amount of fruit with some malt.
Taste: Moderate hops, otherwise bready. Some fruit is present at the start.
Mouthfeel: Light to medium bodied with some decent carbonation.

Arbor Brewing’s Red Snapper is a pale ale with amber-like qualities. Featuring flavors of bread, spice and fruit, Red Snapper is a refreshing pale ale without a ton of bitterness. Hops are certainly present, but they present more balance than anything else.