Posts

During a time of year when the skies are grey and the temperatures are sub-zero, the Traverse City Winter Microbrew & Music Festival provides the reprieve so many need. The sixth rendition of this winter festival was held on Saturday and recreated the fun, vibrant and supportive atmosphere that Traverse City has become known for.

While similar to the Summer Microbrew & Music Festival also hosted by Porterhouse Productions, the winter version carries a different connotation, atmosphere and character.

“Winter has a different soul. Folks come out of hibernation and it is a much needed community-energizing cultural medicine for all,” said Sam Porter, owner of Porterhouse Productions.

This “cultural medicine” is light-hearted, energetic and inspiring. It contains more “up north” spirit and spunk. Over 50 breweries were present at the festival, most of which were Michigan based; a majority of the wide range of musical acts also come from Michigan.

Four tents were set up, each containing a different set of breweries and performers. Festival goers could also enjoy food from local food trucks on site, follow the rare brew tour and participate in a homebrewing contest.

“Education is at the front of the craft beer movement and we aim to specialize in building a diverse audience with the different genres of music and market that gathers and grows the market. Craft beer fans are intelligent, curious and ready to learn more about something they love,” said Porter.

Opportunities to learn more and experience something new were aplenty at the festival.The rare brew tour, for instance, created an excitement for new experimental brews. A new brew was tapped each half hour, which led to lines and “tap that keg” chants. And many of the rare beers — including a coffee infused Dragon’s Milk from New Holland — were gone in about 15 minutes.

Breweries large and small were present, which gave festival-goers a chance to find their favorite breweries, while also learning about newer breweries that are also doing amazing things. Short’s once again created their fun ski-bar and brought a wide range brews, including a bourbon-aged Evil Urges and Smugglin’ Plums, a dark stout with a surprisingly tart-fruit twist.

Northport Brewing, which opened less than a year ago, found the festival to be a great opportunity to bring its brews to a wider audience.

“We’ve had a long line all night. It’s been nonstop!” said co-owner Pamela Cain.

Brewery Ferment, another small brewery in the area, had festival goers excited about its unique brews. One of the only breweries in the area known for its sour beers, Ferment featured TC Black, a sour black cherry brew that was tart and refreshing. For those with a sweeter palate, they also had Fluffer Nutter, a stout brewed with marshmallows and peanuts.

While education about and experiencing the craft beer market may be at the forefront of the festival, this event also raises money for the local community. 100 percent of all alcohol net proceeds are donated to the festival’s partner non-profits. The Porterhouse team holds multiple events throughout the state each year, all of which help our state in numerous ways.

“It is a great pairing behind the celebration. We have hosted over 35 festivals in Michigan, including 14 Microbrew & Music Festivals, and raised over $100,000 for nonprofits,” said Porter.

Porter hopes to continue to expand the Porterhouse Production team as well at the Microbrew & Music Festivals, creating new and dynamic experiences along the way. The next brewfest will be the Summer Microbrew & Music Festival, a two-day event held in late August.

Follow Microbrew & Music Festival on Facebook for updates on future festivals.

During a time of year when the skies are grey and the temperatures are sub-zero, the Traverse City Winter Microbrew & Music Festival provides the reprieve so many need. The sixth rendition of this winter festival was held on Saturday and recreated the fun, vibrant and supportive atmosphere that Traverse City has become known for.
While similar to the Summer Microbrew & Music Festival also hosted by Porterhouse Productions, the winter version carries a different connotation, atmosphere and character.
“Winter has a different soul. Folks come out of hibernation and it is a much needed community-energizing cultural medicine for all,” said Sam Porter, owner of Porterhouse Productions.
This “cultural medicine” is light-hearted, energetic and inspiring. It contains more “up north” spirit and spunk. Over 50 breweries were present at the festival, most of which were Michigan based; a majority of the wide range of musical acts also come from Michigan.
Four tents were set up, each containing a different set of breweries and performers. Festival goers could also enjoy food from local food trucks on site, follow the rare brew tour and participate in a homebrewing contest.
“Education is at the front of the craft beer movement and we aim to specialize in building a diverse audience with the different genres of music and market that gathers and grows the market. Craft beer fans are intelligent, curious and ready to learn more about something they love,” said Porter.
Opportunities to learn more and experience something new were aplenty at the festival.The rare brew tour, for instance, created an excitement for new experimental brews. A new brew was tapped each half hour, which led to lines and “tap that keg” chants. And many of the rare beers — including a coffee infused Dragon’s Milk from New Holland — were gone in about 15 minutes.
Breweries large and small were present, which gave festival-goers a chance to find their favorite breweries, while also learning about newer breweries that are also doing amazing things. Short’s once again created their fun ski-bar and brought a wide range brews, including a bourbon-aged Evil Urges and Smugglin’ Plums, a dark stout with a surprisingly tart-fruit twist.
Northport Brewing, which opened less than a year ago, found the festival to be a great opportunity to bring its brews to a wider audience.
“We’ve had a long line all night. It’s been nonstop!” said co-owner Pamela Cain.
Brewery Ferment, another small brewery in the area, had festival goers excited about its unique brews. One of the only breweries in the area known for its sour beers, Ferment featured TC Black, a sour black cherry brew that was tart and refreshing. For those with a sweeter palate, they also had Fluffer Nutter, a stout brewed with marshmallows and peanuts.
While education about and experiencing the craft beer market may be at the forefront of the festival, this event also raises money for the local community. 100 percent of all alcohol net proceeds are donated to the festival’s partner non-profits. The Porterhouse team holds multiple events throughout the state each year, all of which help our state in numerous ways.
“It is a great pairing behind the celebration. We have hosted over 35 festivals in Michigan, including 14 Microbrew & Music Festivals, and raised over $100,000 for nonprofits,” said Porter.
Porter hopes to continue to expand the Porterhouse Production team as well at the Microbrew & Music Festivals, creating new and dynamic experiences along the way. The next brewfest will be the Summer Microbrew & Music Festival, a two-day event held in late August.
Follow Microbrew & Music Festival on Facebook for updates on future festivals.

TRAVERSE CITY — Local music, food and beer — a fine combination by any right, but in the setting of a beautiful evening in Northern Michigan they become something even better. The annual Traverse City Summer Microbrew & Music Festival is a celebration of the vibrant local culinary and music scene, with a sampling of some of best beer Michigan brewers have to offer.

Set within the grounds of the renovated state hospital (now known as the Village at Grand Traverse Commons), the increasingly popular festival is a playground for foodies and beer geeks alike.

The festival was a change of pace from the previous beer festivals I’ve attended, in that this one held a pretty equal emphasis on beer, food and music. That said, most of the breweries here left the barrel-aged and one-off experiments at home, something that I was initially not too excited about. Most everything that was present was something that I’ve either had before, or was readily available in bottles.

After a few samples of some old standbys, it got me thinking — having constantly been in the search for aforementioned barrel-aged monsters, I realized how spoiled I’ve become living in such an amazing beer state as Michigan. What has become the “norm” on the beer shelves in this state are some truly world class beers that are excellent, well balanced representatives of their respective styles.

I took this opportunity to stroll down hazy-memory lane with the old malty friends that got me started on craft beer in the first place. To twist a phrase from the side of Short’s Pandemonium Pale Ale, sometimes I forget to stop and behold the bitter hysteria.

Jolly Pumpkin — La Roja
An wild American amber ale, this beer is a perfect example of the signature JP funk. Pours a deep ruby red body with a thin, fizzy white head. Nose is dry and tart, with the sour funk from the wild yeast predominating. Its body features the lightly roasted malts you would expect from an amber ale. Slightly more acetic and tart than the nose, with another hefty dose of the brett funk. Finishes with the funk and bit of grapefruit from the hops. Very well-rounded beer and a great starter for those who have yet to delve into sour ales.

Short’s Brewing Company — Pandemonium Pale Ale
A beautiful, light copper colored body with a loose, fluffy white head. Its smell is a perfect mix of earthy hops and toasted malts. Toasted, biscuit flavors from the malt present throughout the body, with a pleasant hoppy finish. There’s nothing overpowering about this beer — it’s very well balanced — a beer you could easily have a few of on a hot summer day.

Right Brain Brewery — Black (eye) PA
A rich, dark tan head sits atop a midnight black body. The head leaves a gorgeous thin lacing the entire way down the glass. Roasted malts, chocolate and citrus hop flavors dominate the nose, continuing into the body. Tastes the same as the nose — roasted malts fade into a pleasant hoppy finish. A fantastic take on a relatively new style, this brew is a must try for stout fans who are looking for something a little lighter on the body during the summer months.

This contact form is deactivated because you refused to accept Google reCaptcha service which is necessary to validate any messages sent by the form.