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territorial brewing

SPRINGFIELD, Mich. – Territorial Brewing Company, a brewery in Springfield that specializes in brewing lagers, announced it has expanded brewing operations into a new production facility to meet increased demand by beer lovers, bars and restaurants in Battle Creek.

The first batch of beer was brewed at the new location on Dec. 4, 2017.

“We have struggled to brew enough beer and keep up with demand since first opening in November of 2014, and this new location will allow us to keep up with demand while staying true to the beers we love to make,” said Tim Davis, co-owner of Territorial Brewing Company.

Up until December, Territorial was brewing beer in a space shared with its restaurant kitchen.

“The space was incredibly cramped and we were constantly getting in the way of the kitchen staff, and vice versa,” Davis said. “In fact, it got so bad that we resorted to only brewing beer at night, when the kitchen was closed. This new location will allow us to brew beer on a more consistent schedule and keep up with demand.”

Territorial produces mostly lager beers, which take considerably longer to ferment than ales. This limits the overall volume of beer Territorial can produce in a given time.

“Territorial Brewing Company excels at brewing German-inspired beers that require a lengthy fermentation time and keen attention to detail, and this new production facility will allow them to meet the growing demand for these high-quality lagers,” said Bud Dunn, president of Atlas Sales Inc. “We’re proud to work hand-in-hand with small craft brewers like Territorial Brewing Company to help them grow and succeed.”

The new production brewery is not open to the public. However, the original restaurant and taproom, located at 256 N Helmer Road, will remain open.

“We’re proud to serve as a gathering place for so many customers who live and work nearby and thank them for their loyalty as we worked through our behind-the-scenes growing pains the last three years,” said Charles Grantier, co-owner of Territorial Brewing Company.

 “As Battle Creek’s only brewery, we want to help make Battle Creek and Springfield a fun, vibrant community and a destination for visitors near and far,” Davis said.

 

Atwater

Grand Rapids, Mich – As Atwater Brewing approaches its one-year anniversary at its Grand Rapids location, the Detroit-based craft brewery kicks off celebrations with Oktoberfest on Saturday, September 9. This 21 and over event will take place at its downtown Grand Rapids location at 201 Michigan Street NW from 11 a.m. to 1 a.m.

Attendees can expect true Oktoberfest festivities with German-style food, German-style beers, and live music. They can also compete in shuffleboard and the traditional Oktoberfest “mug holding contests.” The winners will receive gift cards and Atwater swag. The first 25 people to attend will get a free mug club membership for a year.

This is an rain-or-shine event with tented outdoor areas. No advance ticket purchases are necessary, but attendees will be asked to show identification at the door.

Other Atwater Brewery News

As parking becomes a growing concern in downtown Grand Rapids, Atwater Brewing will now provide parking validation tickets to visitors, covering one hour of parking. The closest parking lots available to the public are located under DeVos Place and near the government buildings. Street parking is also available on Monroe Avenue and is free after 6 p.m. and all day on Sundays.

Cedar Springs Brewing

I’m seated in an industrial looking, high-ceiled venue that’s filled with long picnic tables, various flags gently waving in front of second story windows, fermentation vessels peeking out from high above the bar, and wooden sliding doors that divide the space into private room, main beer hall, and back of house operations. Upon closer inspection, I find little hints of artwork from the old Schnitzelbank restaurant, recommissioned kegs that serve as bathroom sinks, and I even note the cluster of Weissbier glasses drenched in light throughout the space.

I am, of course, in Cedar Springs Brewing Company, the newest addition to our family of craft breweries in Michigan. Located at 95 Main in downtown Cedar Springs, this gem of Germanic goodness opened its doors on November 13 this year to excited guests. I’m here almost a month later and I must say that I’m enjoying this Monday afternoon as compared to the boisterous nature of the opening. This time, I even get to sit and indulge in food as well as beer.

Within the hall, the almost non-existent acoustics allow for raucous laughter to roll off the walls and startle my senses. It’s obvious that patrons are merry with good beer and friends, and what better way to relish in that than by sitting at a long, inviting table? It’s been said plenty of times before that we Americans like to have our “space”, but adding new friends to your group can make for a great time. The idea of sharing a table is blasphemous to some, but here it’s encouraged; a nice nod to traditional standards from that sweet ol’ land of Germany.

Cedar Springs Brewing

What I noticed immediately about both the beer and the food menu is the obvious dichotomy between old world and new. German fare is designated on one side of the menu labeled Bavarian Menu. The standard American fare is on the opposite side. Though it can be an uncommon practice to visually separate food types, by doing so, Cedar Springs seems to beg the question, “Are you craving a traditional or a modern approach today?”

The divide is further pronounced with the beer offerings. At the tap handles behind the bar, German beers are labeled as “Küsterer” while the American style beers are given the Cedar Springs Brewing Company logCedar Springs Brewingo. The same structure is found on the actual menu.

Since I already had a German style Weissbier in front of me, I couldn’t help but choose the “traditional” route for my food.

Knoblauchsuppe, or rather, garlic soup is the first item on my list. Personally I usually steer away from anything directly garlicky because of the pungent flavors that will emanate and haunt me the rest of the night. However, this soup contains all the lovely flavors of garlic without the effective scent left behind. This mouth-watering, perfectly salted soup was so delicious that I ended up ordering another. My advice? Order this soup and wash it down with the Küsterer Original Weissbier. I found it to be a nice little pairing.

Up next was the Leberkäse, a seared Bavarian pork loaf that comes with a sunny side-up egg, greens, mustard, and bread. Salty and savory, it was just begging for a beer. I paired this dish with the Küsterer Salzburger Märzen so the lovely and subtle lager could wipe out the salt and fat and cleanse my palate.

Cedar Springs Brewing

Though I didn’t eat more from the menu that day, one item in particular called attention to itself. On the American fare portion of the menu was a sandwich that I believe is worth noting and bringing friends back in for. I’m talking about The Monstrosity Burger.

Coming in at $33.50 and recommended to be eaten by 2-4 people, this insane burger invites a great challenge that is likely to be met with wide eyes and cheers from fellow beer drinkers in the hall. The burger itself is a “Lumbertown burger with sloppy Shaun, pub pulled pork, wager smoked brisket, bacon, american cheese, smoked cheddar, gouda cheese, memphis class sauce, fried egg, crispy onions, and tomato on a classic bun. Comes with a ½ lb of flannel fries and two whole chicken wings”. Indeed!

Turning our focus toward the malty liquids, I’d like to leave you off with my brief impressions of a couple beers that were on tap for the day. Though the variety and amount of beer available is still on the lighter side due to the opening, I want to point out that the styles produced here just so happen to be beers you’d want to drink several glasses of anyway.

The Küsterer Original Weissbier is a pretty little weizen that is indeed quite hazy and a deep amber in color. A white head sits on top and takes its time disintegrating in my glass. Bread and lemon are the most prominent flavors and aroma. A hint of clove lingers in the background of this traditional and comforting beer.

Cedar Springs Brewing

Cedar Springs Yinzers Roundabout IPA was a collaboration beer with Roundabout Brewing from Pittsburgh. This clear and burnished gold colored IPA was quite well balanced and thirst-quenching for an American style IPA. It provided light floral and honey notes along with a layered bready character that binds it all together. It’s pleasantly and balancing-ly bitter throughout, though that’s not the defining feature of the brew. The malt provides a bread-like sweetness that balances the almost European-esque display of hops, though I know the varieties used actually originate from New Zealand and the United States. Overall it’s a pretty beer that lends plenty of opportunity for pairing in the future.

Cedar Springs is now home to a 15-barrel system brewery that is owned by David Ringler and hasbrewing operations run by head brewer, Matt Peterson, previously of Schlafly Beer of St. Louis. It appears to me that they have a long and wonderful road ahead of them, despite the normal hiccups of any new operation. I was delighted to make an appearance and I’m already parched sitting here thinking about that Weissbier. Should you see me in the brewery on my next visit, please join me at my table for a well deserved “Prost!” to Cedar Springs Brewing Company.

 

Cedar Springs Brewing

I’m seated in an industrial looking, high-ceiled venue that’s filled with long picnic tables, various flags gently waving in front of second story windows, fermentation vessels peeking out from high above the bar, and wooden sliding doors that divide the space into private room, main beer hall, and back of house operations. Upon closer inspection, I find little hints of artwork from the old Schnitzelbank restaurant, recommissioned kegs that serve as bathroom sinks, and I even note the cluster of Weissbier glasses drenched in light throughout the space.
I am, of course, in Cedar Springs Brewing Company, the newest addition to our family of craft breweries in Michigan. Located at 95 Main in downtown Cedar Springs, this gem of Germanic goodness opened its doors on November 13 this year to excited guests. I’m here almost a month later and I must say that I’m enjoying this Monday afternoon as compared to the boisterous nature of the opening. This time, I even get to sit and indulge in food as well as beer.
Within the hall, the almost non-existent acoustics allow for raucous laughter to roll off the walls and startle my senses. It’s obvious that patrons are merry with good beer and friends, and what better way to relish in that than by sitting at a long, inviting table? It’s been said plenty of times before that we Americans like to have our “space”, but adding new friends to your group can make for a great time. The idea of sharing a table is blasphemous to some, but here it’s encouraged; a nice nod to traditional standards from that sweet ol’ land of Germany.
Cedar Springs Brewing
What I noticed immediately about both the beer and the food menu is the obvious dichotomy between old world and new. German fare is designated on one side of the menu labeled Bavarian Menu. The standard American fare is on the opposite side. Though it can be an uncommon practice to visually separate food types, by doing so, Cedar Springs seems to beg the question, “Are you craving a traditional or a modern approach today?”
The divide is further pronounced with the beer offerings. At the tap handles behind the bar, German beers are labeled as “Küsterer” while the American style beers are given the Cedar Springs Brewing Company logCedar Springs Brewingo. The same structure is found on the actual menu.
Since I already had a German style Weissbier in front of me, I couldn’t help but choose the “traditional” route for my food.
Knoblauchsuppe, or rather, garlic soup is the first item on my list. Personally I usually steer away from anything directly garlicky because of the pungent flavors that will emanate and haunt me the rest of the night. However, this soup contains all the lovely flavors of garlic without the effective scent left behind. This mouth-watering, perfectly salted soup was so delicious that I ended up ordering another. My advice? Order this soup and wash it down with the Küsterer Original Weissbier. I found it to be a nice little pairing.
Up next was the Leberkäse, a seared Bavarian pork loaf that comes with a sunny side-up egg, greens, mustard, and bread. Salty and savory, it was just begging for a beer. I paired this dish with the Küsterer Salzburger Märzen so the lovely and subtle lager could wipe out the salt and fat and cleanse my palate.
Cedar Springs Brewing
Though I didn’t eat more from the menu that day, one item in particular called attention to itself. On the American fare portion of the menu was a sandwich that I believe is worth noting and bringing friends back in for. I’m talking about The Monstrosity Burger.
Coming in at $33.50 and recommended to be eaten by 2-4 people, this insane burger invites a great challenge that is likely to be met with wide eyes and cheers from fellow beer drinkers in the hall. The burger itself is a “Lumbertown burger with sloppy Shaun, pub pulled pork, wager smoked brisket, bacon, american cheese, smoked cheddar, gouda cheese, memphis class sauce, fried egg, crispy onions, and tomato on a classic bun. Comes with a ½ lb of flannel fries and two whole chicken wings”. Indeed!
Turning our focus toward the malty liquids, I’d like to leave you off with my brief impressions of a couple beers that were on tap for the day. Though the variety and amount of beer available is still on the lighter side due to the opening, I want to point out that the styles produced here just so happen to be beers you’d want to drink several glasses of anyway.
The Küsterer Original Weissbier is a pretty little weizen that is indeed quite hazy and a deep amber in color. A white head sits on top and takes its time disintegrating in my glass. Bread and lemon are the most prominent flavors and aroma. A hint of clove lingers in the background of this traditional and comforting beer.
Cedar Springs Brewing
Cedar Springs Yinzers Roundabout IPA was a collaboration beer with Roundabout Brewing from Pittsburgh. This clear and burnished gold colored IPA was quite well balanced and thirst-quenching for an American style IPA. It provided light floral and honey notes along with a layered bready character that binds it all together. It’s pleasantly and balancing-ly bitter throughout, though that’s not the defining feature of the brew. The malt provides a bread-like sweetness that balances the almost European-esque display of hops, though I know the varieties used actually originate from New Zealand and the United States. Overall it’s a pretty beer that lends plenty of opportunity for pairing in the future.
Cedar Springs is now home to a 15-barrel system brewery that is owned by David Ringler and hasbrewing operations run by head brewer, Matt Peterson, previously of Schlafly Beer of St. Louis. It appears to me that they have a long and wonderful road ahead of them, despite the normal hiccups of any new operation. I was delighted to make an appearance and I’m already parched sitting here thinking about that Weissbier. Should you see me in the brewery on my next visit, please join me at my table for a well deserved “Prost!” to Cedar Springs Brewing Company.
 

German Translation: Grand Opening Celebration

CEDAR SPRINGS – Cedar Springs Brewing Company, a German-inspired, family-friendly microbrewery will soon be warming the heart of Main Street in Cedar Springs.

The brewery’s grand opening celebration will begin on Friday, Nov. 13 at 1 p.m. with a ribbon cutting and ceremonial first pour.

The festivities will continue throughout the weekend as they unveil the full menu for the first time. While Head Chef and “Curator of Culinary Creation” Shaun Wooden’s main focus will be traditional Bavarian cuisine, the menu will feature a wide variety of food, including a kid’s menu. Once inside, Grand Rapids natives may recognize panels from the former downtown Schnitzelbank restaurant within the microbrewery walls; a nod to the rich German history within Beer City.

The microbrewery will offer a unique bar menu featuring Lagers, Pilsners, Hefeweizens, Pale Ales… oh my! alongside Cedar Cider and Vino131 Wine. For the under-21 group and drivers among us, Cedar Springs Brewing is also offering Old Cedar Creek soda, which includes almost as many flavors as the styles on their beer tap list. The tap list will be updated in real-time on their Facebook page, complete with information on how much of each style of beer is actually left, thanks to the wonderful world of technology – and digitalpour.com

Cedar Springs Brewing’s Head Brewer and “Barley, Malt and Hops Wrangler” Matt Peterson is utilizing traditional German open-fermentation methods to brew Lagers, and will also brew Ales on their 15-barrel brew system with a capacity of 1500 barrels per year. The brewing system didn’t have far to travel, as it came from Psycho Brew out of Belding, Michigan.

In the spring, a Bier Garden will feature a brick patio with trees and tables that will expand seating and face the White Pine Trail, greeting runners, bikers, and even snowmobilers in the winter.

Since Owner and ”Director of Happiness” David Ringler broke ground on this authentic German microbrewery back in October 2014, his goal remains the same: to be a family-friendly, laid-back restaurant, and microbrewery for the community of Cedar Springs—a place where friends can get together to enjoy a meal and a beer after a sporting event, or heading in or out of Beer City, Grand Rapids.

Cedar Springs Brewing Company is located at 95 North Main Street in Cedar Springs.


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