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New Display Part of “FOOD: Transforming the American Table”

 

Boulder, Colo.  – The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History will explore the history and industry of brewing in the United States in a new showcase located within the “FOOD: Transforming the American Table” exhibition beginning Oct. 25.

“FOOD: Transforming the American Table” is an existing, permanent exhibition that explores the history of food and eating in the United States since 1950. The exhibition’s fall update will highlight new stories about changes in food itself and how Americans produce, prepare and consume food and drink. One of four major new sections is “Brewing a Revolution.

The history of brewing in the U.S. is a story of immigration, urban change, technological innovation and evolving consumer tastes. During the nation’s early years, Americans drank ales, mostly brewed by women and enslaved people, at home. The arrival of European professional brewers—nearly all men—in the 1800s created a nation of lager lovers. While Prohibition in 1920 banned the production of intoxicating beverages, the story of American beer was far from over.

Visitors will see artifacts, archival materials and photographs that originated in the homebrewing and microbrewing movements of California and Colorado in the 1960s through 1980s—the beginning of the craft beer “revolution.”

The “Brewing a Revolution” showcases are the work of curator Theresa McCulla, who has led the museum’s American Brewing History Initiative since 2017. She has been mining the existing collections and traveling across the country researching, collecting, preserving and sharing this history to expand the collections with a focus on brewing in the 20th and 21st centuries.

“The artifacts featured in this new display convey histories of innovation, creativity and risk, as well as deep pride and pleasure in the processes of brewing and drinking beer in the United States,” said McCulla. “Beer is a thread that runs throughout the fabric of our nation’s history and culture.”

Part of the Smithsonian Food History project, the museum initiated the American Brewing History Initiative in 2016 with funding from the Brewers Association, the Boulder, Colorado-based not-for-profit trade association dedicated to small and independent American brewers. The Brewers Association recently funded an extension of the initiative through 2022.

“The craft brewing revolution in America has had a profound social, cultural and economic impact on this country,” said Bob Pease, president and CEO of the Brewers Association. “America is a beer nation, and we are honored to support this effort and work with the National Museum of American History to chronicle and showcase the significant achievements small and independent brewers and homebrewers have made throughout our nation’s history.”

A wooden home-brewing spoon that belonged to Charlie Papazian, past president of the Brewers Association and founder of the Association of Brewers, a microscope used by Fritz Maytag at Anchor Brewing Co. and the travel notebook that helped inspire Kim Jordan and Jeff Lebesch to found New Belgium Brewing Co. are among the artifacts on view. McCulla has also recorded oral histories with more than 75 members of the brewing industry.

More information about the initiative and beer history at the museum is available at  http://s.si.edu/BrewHistory.

The Last Call: Brewing History After-Hours

In conjunction with the exhibition opening and as part of the three-day Smithsonian Food History Weekend, Nov. 7–9, McCulla will moderate a conversation among several key figures in the history of craft beer to reflect on beer’s past, present and future during “The Last Call: Brewing History After-Hours” event Friday, Nov. 8. Participating are Maytag, former owner of Anchor Brewing Co.; Ken Grossman, founder of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.; Papazian, founder of the Association of Brewers; and Michael Lewis, professor emeritus of Food Science and Technology at the University of California, Davis.

The following breweries will pour beer tastings: Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, Milton, Delaware, 60 Minute IPA and Slightly Mighty IPA; Anchor Brewing Co., San Francisco, Anchor Steam Beer and Anchor Porter; Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., Chico, California, and Mills River, North Carolina, Pale Ale and Celebration Fresh Hop IPA; Raleigh Brewing Company, Raleigh, North Carolina, New Albion Ale and Hell Yes Ma’am Belgian Golden Ale; and New Belgium Brewing Co., Fort Collins, Colorado, and Asheville, North Carolina, Fat Tire Amber Ale and Voodoo Ranger IPA.

Tickets for The Last Call are $45 for beer tastings, appetizers and a one-night-only display of brewing-history objects out of storage, including recent acquisitions. To purchase tickets and for more information, visit https://s.si.edu/LastCall.

Leadership support for “FOOD: Transforming the American Table” is made possible by Warren and Barbara Winiarski (Winiarski Family Foundation), the Brewers Association, the Julia Child Foundation for Gastronomy and the Culinary Arts, the Land O’Lakes Foundation, the 2018 Food History Gala Supporters and History Channel.

The National Museum of American History explores the infinite richness and complexity of American history. The museum helps people understand the past in order to make sense of the present and shape a more humane future. For more information about the museum, visit http://americanhistory.si.edu. Explore the museum’s social media on Twitter (@amhistorymuseum), Facebook (@National Museum of American History) and Instagram (@amhistorymuseum). #SmithsonianFood and #BeerHistory

The museum is located on Constitution Avenue, between 12th and 14th streets N.W., and is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (closed Dec. 25). Admission is free. For Smithsonian information, the public may call (202) 633-1000.

About the Brewers Association

The Brewers Association (BA) is the not-for-profit trade association dedicated to small and independent American brewers, their beers and the community of brewing enthusiasts. The BA represents 5,000-plus U.S. breweries. The BA’s independent craft brewer seal is a widely adopted symbol that differentiates beers by small and independent craft brewers. The BA organizes events including the World Beer Cup®Great American Beer Festival®Craft Brewers Conference® & BrewExpo America®SAVOR: An American Craft Beer & Food ExperienceHomebrew ConTMNational Homebrew Competition and American Craft Beer Week®. The BA publishes The New Brewer® magazine, and Brewers Publications® is the leading publisher of brewing literature in the U.S. Beer lovers are invited to learn more about the dynamic world of craft beer at CraftBeer.com® and about homebrewing via the BA’s American Homebrewers Association® and the free Brew Guru® mobile app. Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram.

The Brewers Association is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, or marital/familial status. The BA complies with provisions of Executive Order 11246 and the rules, regulations, and relevant orders of the Secretary of Labor.

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charlie papazian

PHOTO © BREWERS ASSOCIATION

Boulder, CO —The Brewers Association (BA)—the not-for-profit trade group dedicated to promoting and protecting America’s small and independent craft brewers—today announced that founder and past president Charlie Papazian will exit the Brewers Association on January 23, 2019, marking his 70th birthday and 40 years building the craft brewing community and inspiring brewers and beer lovers around the world.

“We are all here today because of Charlie Papazian,” said Bob Pease, president and CEO, Brewers Association. “His influence on the homebrewing and craft brewing community is immeasurable. Who could have predicted that a simple wooden spoon, ingenuity and passion would spawn a community of more than one million homebrewers and 6,000 small and independent U.S. craft breweries.”

Charlie Papazian, founder of the American Homebrewers Association (AHA) and the Association of Brewers, set the stage for homebrewing back in the 1970s. His expertise and friendly tone assured people that making good beer was possible at home. He stressed his catchphrase of “Relax. Don’t worry. Have a homebrew” in his first book, The Complete Joy of Homebrewing and inspired millions to pick up the hobby of homebrewing.

In 1978, Papazian, along with Charlie Matzen, formed the AHA in Boulder, CO. They published the first issue of Zymurgy magazine, announcing the new organization, publicizing the federal legalization of homebrewing and calling for entries in the first AHA National Homebrew Competition. Today, the AHA is more than 46,000 members strong.

In 1982, Papazian debuted the Great American Beer Festival (GABF) in Boulder, CO. Now in its 37th year, GABF is the largest ticketed beer festival in North America with more than 60,000 attendees annually and its accompanying competition is one of the most coveted awards in the brewing industry.

The following year, the Association of Brewers was organized to include the AHA and the Institute for Brewing and Fermentation Studies to assist the emerging microbrewery movement in US. By 2005, the Association of Brewers and the Brewers’ Association of America merged to form the Brewers Association.

When asked, “Charlie, did you ever imagine that beer would become this?” His answer is always yes.

“I had a playful vision that there would be a homebrewer in every neighborhood and a brewery in every town. But what I did not imagine, couldn’t imagine, never considered, was the impact that craft brewing would have on our culture, economy and American life,” mused Papazian.

Papazian will spend his final year at the BA completing many projects, including a craft brewing history archive project. The archive will house 40 years of craft beer history in the form of more than 100,000 publications, photographs, audiotapes, films, videos, and documents—including 140 video interviews of the pioneers of American craft brewing—and will be accessible to researchers via the BA. He will also deliver the keynote address at the AHA’s 40th annual National Homebrew Conference, “Hombrew Con,” in Portland, OR on Thursday, June 28.

Brewers and homebrewers are invited to share their well wishes and Charlie Papazian stories on the AHA and BA Facebook pages.

 

GRAND RAPIDS — Charlie Papazian. If you homebrew, you know this name. Author of the quintessential “The Complete Joy of Home Brewing,” founder and president of the American Homebrewers Association and all around godfather of the American homebrew scene, MittenBrew caught Charlie right before a book signing to ask some quick questions about Grand Rapids, and AHA’s presence here.

“Michigan has zoomed to the top of the list, so to speak, of states that really embrace craft beer, craft brewing and home brewing. From what I understand it’s a very craft brew friendly state and a homebrew friendly state.

“Grand Rapids deserves the name BeerCity. Everywhere I go people are great, friendly and helpful. There’s a great spirit here and it spills over, the spirit that made [Grand Rapids] BeerCity USA. That enthusiasm and support for local breweries and local beer, you can see it just walking around. There’s a lot of local businesses that have benefited from the community spirit this town tries to foster, it’s pretty cool.

“Having the conference here is, you know, as long as we don’t grow too gigantic and the conference doesn’t grow too huge, having Grand Rapids [host] is a great example of the kind of cities we can go to. Cities that are not necessarily giant metropolitan cities, cities that aren’t on peoples radars that would be great places to have conferences like this. Like Grand Rapids.”

Papazian’s book, “The Complete Joy of Home Brewing,” is available throughout the National Homebrewers Conference, which lasts through today.

GRAND RAPIDS — Charlie Papazian. If you homebrew, you know this name. Author of the quintessential “The Complete Joy of Home Brewing,” founder and president of the American Homebrewers Association and all around godfather of the American homebrew scene, MittenBrew caught Charlie right before a book signing to ask some quick questions about Grand Rapids, and AHA’s presence here.
“Michigan has zoomed to the top of the list, so to speak, of states that really embrace craft beer, craft brewing and home brewing. From what I understand it’s a very craft brew friendly state and a homebrew friendly state.
“Grand Rapids deserves the name BeerCity. Everywhere I go people are great, friendly and helpful. There’s a great spirit here and it spills over, the spirit that made [Grand Rapids] BeerCity USA. That enthusiasm and support for local breweries and local beer, you can see it just walking around. There’s a lot of local businesses that have benefited from the community spirit this town tries to foster, it’s pretty cool.
“Having the conference here is, you know, as long as we don’t grow too gigantic and the conference doesn’t grow too huge, having Grand Rapids [host] is a great example of the kind of cities we can go to. Cities that are not necessarily giant metropolitan cities, cities that aren’t on peoples radars that would be great places to have conferences like this. Like Grand Rapids.”
Papazian’s book, “The Complete Joy of Home Brewing,” is available throughout the National Homebrewers Conference, which lasts through today.