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cedar springs

The brewery is bringing its German-inspired brews to Grand Rapids’s West Side

 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. — Cedar Springs Brewing is bringing its German-inspired beers to a historically German neighborhood in Grand Rapids.

The brewery has announced plans to develop a second location on the city’s West Side at 642 Bridge Street NW.

Küsterer Brauhaus will join New Holland Brewing Company, Harmony Hall, Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales and the soon-to-come Arktos Meadery on Bridge Street.

The new location is named after Christoph Kusterer, who immigrated to Grand Rapids from Germany in 1844. Kusterer started a brewery in 1847 less than a mile away from what will become Küsterer Brauhaus in 2020.

“We’re excited to return Küsterer Bier to its historical roots, just down Bridge Street from the location of their original brewery and into the evolving ‘Brewery Row’ on the West Side,” said David Ringler, founder and Director of Happiness at Cedar Springs Brewing.

Cedar Springs Brewing opened its doors in Cedar Springs, Michigan in 2015. Heavily inspired by the German tradition of beer brewing, its menu features a mix of Bavarian-inspired food and drink and American pub fare and craft beer.

The new location promises a traditional and authentic German beer hall experience. It will serve the brewery’s signature Küsterer Biers, including traditional Bavarian hefeweizens and lagers, as well as Cedar Springs brand ales and location-specific beers.

“This area was home to several German and Central European beer halls prior to Prohibition, so we look forward to creating a traditional, Munich-style hall as a positive contribution to this vibrant neighborhood,” Ringler said.

Küsterer Brauhaus will have its own three-barrel brewery on site, manufactured in the U.S.A. by Fronhofer Design. The project is being developed by Weber Developments, LLC.

farmers market

The popular local market will kick off on Thursday, June 20

 

CEDAR SPRINGS, MI  — Cedar Springs Brewing Company has announced that its summer farmers market will return for the third year.

The market will take place on Thursdays from 3-7 p.m. starting June 20 and running through September. Vendors will set up in the Heart of Cedar Springs—a grass lot behind the fire station on Maple Street in Cedar Springs near the German-inspired brewery.

farmers market“We’re excited to bring back our farmers market and once again share quality, locally made goods with the rest of the Cedar Springs community throughout the summer,” said David Ringler, Director of Happiness at Cedar Springs Brewing Co.

The local market features vendors from all over West Michigan selling fruits, vegetables and other value-added homemade products. This year’s edition will welcome new vendors as well as returning favorites such as Newton’s Family Farm, Dorothy and Toto’s Kettle Corn and Busy Mom Bakers.

Pets are also welcome to accompany their owners to the market.

“Bring your leashed fur babies for an afternoon of shopping!” Ringler said.

The CSBrew Farmers Market will coincide with the brewery’s popular recurring Jeep Night—a gathering of Jeep enthusiasts featuring live music and product displays. This summer’s Jeep Night series will begin June 20 at 6:00 p.m.

More community events at the market will be unveiled throughout the summer.

A new event series launching this summer, Dream Ride Night, will celebrate classic, modified and fun rides on two or four wheels. It will begin June 18th.

“Keep an eye on our website and social media for updates on upcoming market events,” Ringler  said.

The CSBrew Farmers Market is currently looking for sponsors. If you or your business is interested in sponsoring the market, or a market event, please reach out to opportunity@csbrew.com for more information.

cedar springs

Cedar Springs, Mich. — Cedar Springs Brewing is proud to announce a new partnership with West Side Beer Distributing. The brewery’s historical and traditional Küsterer Bier brand lagers and ales are now available on tap at bars and restaurants in Kent County.

“We are very excited to partner with Cedar Springs Brewing Company and help grow the Küsterer brands’ distribution throughout the Kent County market,” said West Side Beer Distributing Key Account Manager Kyle Klopcic.

West Side Beer Distributing is a beer wholesaler based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The company provides Anheuser Busch products as well as over 40 craft and import beer brands to customers in the Grand Rapids, Lansing, Kalamazoo and Romulus areas.

In June, the distributor began providing Cedar Springs brews on draft at its retailers within Kent County.

“We are fortunate to have some outstanding wholesalers available within our home market, but we felt West Side was the best fit for us and will allow us to service our retail customers more efficiently,” said David Ringler, director of happiness at Cedar Springs Brewing Company.

cedar springs

Cedar Springs Brewing Company’s Küsterer Bier line is named for Christoph Kusterer, a German immigrant who arrived in West Michigan around 1844. One of the earliest brewers in Grand Rapids, Kusterer helped establish a brewing legacy that lasted over a century.

Cedar Springs Brewing Company pays homage to that legacy with their eponymous brand. The beers in the Küsterer Bier brand are brewed following German and Bavarian traditions and include a variety of Weissbiers (Hefeweizens), Pilsner, Märzen, Bocks, Dunkels and other lagers. Find them on draft throughout Kent County now.

“As evidenced by the numerous awards the beers have won, Küsterer brands are brewed to the highest standards, and we feel the traditional German styles fill a current void in the local craft beer market,” Klopcic said.

cedar spring brewingCEDAR SPRINGS, MICH – Cedar Springs Brewing Company, a German-inspired restaurant and brewery, is pleased to announce they will be hosting a new local Farmers Market on Thursday mornings starting on June 8. CSBrew Farmers Market, running from 8AM to 12PM weekly, will offer fresh, seasonal produce from local area farmers to everyone in the community.

“We’ve celebrated local since before we’ve opened our doors, and we’ve been grateful to the City of Cedar Springs, the Cedar Springs Area Chamber of Commerce and other local markets for working with us to bring this weekly farmer’s market into the Heart of Cedar Springs on Thursday mornings.” David Ringler, Director of Happiness at Cedar Springs Brewing Co., shares, “We hope this becomes an asset to the entire community and our guests should enjoy some of the daily specials Chef Shaun will be preparing using these seasonal ingredients.”

Due to the recent closure of area markets such as the long running Plainfield Township Farmers Market and the Solon Township Farmers Market, Ringler and crew realized that there was a now a need for a community hub to source seasonal and local produce. Working closely with the City of Cedar Springs and area farmers to fill the void left by these closures, Cedar Springs Brewing took the lead in making sure that both farmers and customers were provided with a place to sell and purchase nutritional, affordable and fresh fruits and vegetables.

cedar springs brewing

Cedar Springs Brewing Company will actively feature specials highlighting various product from area farms, and they encourage you to come in for lunch hour on your visits to CSBrew Farmers Market and sample their offerings.

 

About Cedar Springs Brewing Company                                                                                   Restaurant. Brauhaus. Biergarten. Small Wine Maker. Small Distiller. Craft Sodas. Join us in the heart of Cedar Springs for a freshly crafted beverage and a flavorful meal from our sustainably sourced kitchen, featuring fresh pub fare and a traditional German Bavarian menu. We are located on Main Street and back up to the Fred Meijer White Pine Trail State Park, just 18 minutes north of Grand Rapids.

Schmeckt gut!

 

coldbreak brewing

I had the pleasure of chatting with Boyd Culver and Chris Musil of Coldbreak Brewing Equipment recently. They’re new to the home brew store community, and with their educational classes and their Homebrew League involvement, we at MittenBrew thought it was about time to chat about their new venture out in Cedar Springs, Michigan.

coldbreak brewing

Steil: You’ve been selling your products online before the physical store opened, correct? What inspired you to start selling product online in the first place and how did that morph into a physical location?

Culver: “Because we have our own brand of equipment, it was our way of having it nationally. We have around a hundred stores in the US that carry our brands. Not everybody has access to it, so that was why we sold strictly our brand online. We had no intentions of having a homebrew store…but then Dave (Ringler) got ahold of us and it fit”

 

Steil: How long has Coldbreak Brewing Equipment had its physical location?

Musil: “It was about a week before the brewery (Cedar Springs Brewing Company) opened.”

 

Steil: Why Cedar Springs?

Boyd: “We’ve got customers like Siciliano’s, O’Conner’s, Gravel Bottom, Pauly’s… they’re all customers of our brand of equipment, so we’re essentially competitors of theirs, but we went to them to make sure they were ok with us putting a homebrew store in. They were totally fine with it and they said there’s nobody north of Grand Rapids and there’s a lot of homebrewers north of Grand Rapids, but there’s nobody to facilitate them.”

Musil: “And it was far enough away that we felt that, ok, we’re not competing with them in the same way.”

 

Steil: What relationships do you have with other homebrew shops? Is there a sense of camaraderie like in other portions of the beer world such as with breweries?

Both: “Yes!”

Culver: “You can even see it with the Homebrew League, since we’re all involved with the Homebrew League.”

Musil: “That and even ordering our yeast is with Gravel Bottom because of the shipping costs and all that. It’s such a fragile product that we all put our orders together and split the shipping costs.”

Culver: “But we’re all friends, Steve (Siciliano) was my first customer with Coldbreak. He started selling the chillers on consignment, and basically if he would have said no, I don’t know that any of this would have existed.”

“Well and then with Big Brew day on Calder, it was obviously started by Siciliano’s, but then Gravel Bottom and Cold Break co-hosted it starting this year, so moving forward it’ll get more teamwork out of that.”

 

Steil: You’re known for producing and selling jockey boxes nationally. How did that get started?

Culver: “I mean, there wasn’t a lot of competition for the products and all of the products compared to ours were inferior. We just looked at it, and it looks like a cheap item and then you’re serving something that you put your heart and soul into a poorly put together jockey box. And I think that with better quality products like our jockey boxes, people tend to take care of it better because of that higher value.”

Musil: “And actually the price is comparable to what you can buy elsewhere for lesser quality jockey boxes.”

coldbreak brewing

 

Steil: Do you see seasonality with your products? Changes during the seasons?

Culver: “In the home brewing industry, summertime is awful for sales. They plummet, because no one wants to homebrew because everybody’s on their boat, while it’s the exact opposite for jockey boxes because festival season is right there where it’s the slow time for homebrewing, and so it kind of evens out the year for us.”

 

Steil: What makes your homebrew shop different than the other homebrew shops we have?

Musil: “Our grain is kind of our specialty I think. We got a bigger grain selection than the other stores.”

Culver: “There’s not many in this country that have as many grain options as we do.”

 

Steil: Tell me about the education program you have for Coldbreak.

Culver: “Going back to what makes us different, I think the classes, and we know the other stores offer classes, but Chris does a really good job and he has a nice powerpoint setup, it’s comfortable, and that’s the focus, and any question we have, if we don’t know the answer, we’re very resourceful. The classes are really thorough and in depth, but still down at a level that someone who’s never brewed before can understand it. But then we’re also doing kombucha, wine, and mead classes which are coming up.”

Musil: “Each class is about once a month. The Intro To Homebrewing we had running every couple of weeks, but at the moment it’s summer so we’re having trouble filling them, but it’s not surprising. In fall they’ll pick back up. I’m teaching the Intro class but then we have other guys coming in to teach the other ones if they know more than I do about, say, the wine for the wine class. It’s other homebrewers who come in to teach.”

 

Steil: What do people request most often?

Musil: “Not physical items, but there’s a lot of people coming in looking for help. Like, “I want to do this style of beer, can you help me put a recipe together?” but that’s as far as it goes when it comes to getting consistent requests.”

 

Steil: Do you see a variation in trends from customers about specific products they’re looking for? Anything in particular you’re noticing now?

Musil: “No, but I think that the homebrewers that are in the know, are looking for things like the Azacca hops or the Zeus hops or something specific like that. Just certain ingredients that might be trending at the moment.”

 

With a new storefront location, specially made jockey boxes, an influx of brewing classes, and an obvious want to collaborate with others to create an education friendly environment for homebrewers, Coldbreak Brewing Equipment is no doubt a wanted addition to our Michigan beer family. I want to thank Chris and Boyd once again for taking the time to fill us in on their endeavors! Also be sure to keep up on which classes they are hosting at the store

 

Photography: Steph Harding

Cedar Springs Brewing

I’m seated in an industrial looking, high-ceiled venue that’s filled with long picnic tables, various flags gently waving in front of second story windows, fermentation vessels peeking out from high above the bar, and wooden sliding doors that divide the space into private room, main beer hall, and back of house operations. Upon closer inspection, I find little hints of artwork from the old Schnitzelbank restaurant, recommissioned kegs that serve as bathroom sinks, and I even note the cluster of Weissbier glasses drenched in light throughout the space.

I am, of course, in Cedar Springs Brewing Company, the newest addition to our family of craft breweries in Michigan. Located at 95 Main in downtown Cedar Springs, this gem of Germanic goodness opened its doors on November 13 this year to excited guests. I’m here almost a month later and I must say that I’m enjoying this Monday afternoon as compared to the boisterous nature of the opening. This time, I even get to sit and indulge in food as well as beer.

Within the hall, the almost non-existent acoustics allow for raucous laughter to roll off the walls and startle my senses. It’s obvious that patrons are merry with good beer and friends, and what better way to relish in that than by sitting at a long, inviting table? It’s been said plenty of times before that we Americans like to have our “space”, but adding new friends to your group can make for a great time. The idea of sharing a table is blasphemous to some, but here it’s encouraged; a nice nod to traditional standards from that sweet ol’ land of Germany.

Cedar Springs Brewing

What I noticed immediately about both the beer and the food menu is the obvious dichotomy between old world and new. German fare is designated on one side of the menu labeled Bavarian Menu. The standard American fare is on the opposite side. Though it can be an uncommon practice to visually separate food types, by doing so, Cedar Springs seems to beg the question, “Are you craving a traditional or a modern approach today?”

The divide is further pronounced with the beer offerings. At the tap handles behind the bar, German beers are labeled as “Küsterer” while the American style beers are given the Cedar Springs Brewing Company logCedar Springs Brewingo. The same structure is found on the actual menu.

Since I already had a German style Weissbier in front of me, I couldn’t help but choose the “traditional” route for my food.

Knoblauchsuppe, or rather, garlic soup is the first item on my list. Personally I usually steer away from anything directly garlicky because of the pungent flavors that will emanate and haunt me the rest of the night. However, this soup contains all the lovely flavors of garlic without the effective scent left behind. This mouth-watering, perfectly salted soup was so delicious that I ended up ordering another. My advice? Order this soup and wash it down with the Küsterer Original Weissbier. I found it to be a nice little pairing.

Up next was the Leberkäse, a seared Bavarian pork loaf that comes with a sunny side-up egg, greens, mustard, and bread. Salty and savory, it was just begging for a beer. I paired this dish with the Küsterer Salzburger Märzen so the lovely and subtle lager could wipe out the salt and fat and cleanse my palate.

Cedar Springs Brewing

Though I didn’t eat more from the menu that day, one item in particular called attention to itself. On the American fare portion of the menu was a sandwich that I believe is worth noting and bringing friends back in for. I’m talking about The Monstrosity Burger.

Coming in at $33.50 and recommended to be eaten by 2-4 people, this insane burger invites a great challenge that is likely to be met with wide eyes and cheers from fellow beer drinkers in the hall. The burger itself is a “Lumbertown burger with sloppy Shaun, pub pulled pork, wager smoked brisket, bacon, american cheese, smoked cheddar, gouda cheese, memphis class sauce, fried egg, crispy onions, and tomato on a classic bun. Comes with a ½ lb of flannel fries and two whole chicken wings”. Indeed!

Turning our focus toward the malty liquids, I’d like to leave you off with my brief impressions of a couple beers that were on tap for the day. Though the variety and amount of beer available is still on the lighter side due to the opening, I want to point out that the styles produced here just so happen to be beers you’d want to drink several glasses of anyway.

The Küsterer Original Weissbier is a pretty little weizen that is indeed quite hazy and a deep amber in color. A white head sits on top and takes its time disintegrating in my glass. Bread and lemon are the most prominent flavors and aroma. A hint of clove lingers in the background of this traditional and comforting beer.

Cedar Springs Brewing

Cedar Springs Yinzers Roundabout IPA was a collaboration beer with Roundabout Brewing from Pittsburgh. This clear and burnished gold colored IPA was quite well balanced and thirst-quenching for an American style IPA. It provided light floral and honey notes along with a layered bready character that binds it all together. It’s pleasantly and balancing-ly bitter throughout, though that’s not the defining feature of the brew. The malt provides a bread-like sweetness that balances the almost European-esque display of hops, though I know the varieties used actually originate from New Zealand and the United States. Overall it’s a pretty beer that lends plenty of opportunity for pairing in the future.

Cedar Springs is now home to a 15-barrel system brewery that is owned by David Ringler and hasbrewing operations run by head brewer, Matt Peterson, previously of Schlafly Beer of St. Louis. It appears to me that they have a long and wonderful road ahead of them, despite the normal hiccups of any new operation. I was delighted to make an appearance and I’m already parched sitting here thinking about that Weissbier. Should you see me in the brewery on my next visit, please join me at my table for a well deserved “Prost!” to Cedar Springs Brewing Company.

 

Cedar Springs Brewing

I’m seated in an industrial looking, high-ceiled venue that’s filled with long picnic tables, various flags gently waving in front of second story windows, fermentation vessels peeking out from high above the bar, and wooden sliding doors that divide the space into private room, main beer hall, and back of house operations. Upon closer inspection, I find little hints of artwork from the old Schnitzelbank restaurant, recommissioned kegs that serve as bathroom sinks, and I even note the cluster of Weissbier glasses drenched in light throughout the space.
I am, of course, in Cedar Springs Brewing Company, the newest addition to our family of craft breweries in Michigan. Located at 95 Main in downtown Cedar Springs, this gem of Germanic goodness opened its doors on November 13 this year to excited guests. I’m here almost a month later and I must say that I’m enjoying this Monday afternoon as compared to the boisterous nature of the opening. This time, I even get to sit and indulge in food as well as beer.
Within the hall, the almost non-existent acoustics allow for raucous laughter to roll off the walls and startle my senses. It’s obvious that patrons are merry with good beer and friends, and what better way to relish in that than by sitting at a long, inviting table? It’s been said plenty of times before that we Americans like to have our “space”, but adding new friends to your group can make for a great time. The idea of sharing a table is blasphemous to some, but here it’s encouraged; a nice nod to traditional standards from that sweet ol’ land of Germany.
Cedar Springs Brewing
What I noticed immediately about both the beer and the food menu is the obvious dichotomy between old world and new. German fare is designated on one side of the menu labeled Bavarian Menu. The standard American fare is on the opposite side. Though it can be an uncommon practice to visually separate food types, by doing so, Cedar Springs seems to beg the question, “Are you craving a traditional or a modern approach today?”
The divide is further pronounced with the beer offerings. At the tap handles behind the bar, German beers are labeled as “Küsterer” while the American style beers are given the Cedar Springs Brewing Company logCedar Springs Brewingo. The same structure is found on the actual menu.
Since I already had a German style Weissbier in front of me, I couldn’t help but choose the “traditional” route for my food.
Knoblauchsuppe, or rather, garlic soup is the first item on my list. Personally I usually steer away from anything directly garlicky because of the pungent flavors that will emanate and haunt me the rest of the night. However, this soup contains all the lovely flavors of garlic without the effective scent left behind. This mouth-watering, perfectly salted soup was so delicious that I ended up ordering another. My advice? Order this soup and wash it down with the Küsterer Original Weissbier. I found it to be a nice little pairing.
Up next was the Leberkäse, a seared Bavarian pork loaf that comes with a sunny side-up egg, greens, mustard, and bread. Salty and savory, it was just begging for a beer. I paired this dish with the Küsterer Salzburger Märzen so the lovely and subtle lager could wipe out the salt and fat and cleanse my palate.
Cedar Springs Brewing
Though I didn’t eat more from the menu that day, one item in particular called attention to itself. On the American fare portion of the menu was a sandwich that I believe is worth noting and bringing friends back in for. I’m talking about The Monstrosity Burger.
Coming in at $33.50 and recommended to be eaten by 2-4 people, this insane burger invites a great challenge that is likely to be met with wide eyes and cheers from fellow beer drinkers in the hall. The burger itself is a “Lumbertown burger with sloppy Shaun, pub pulled pork, wager smoked brisket, bacon, american cheese, smoked cheddar, gouda cheese, memphis class sauce, fried egg, crispy onions, and tomato on a classic bun. Comes with a ½ lb of flannel fries and two whole chicken wings”. Indeed!
Turning our focus toward the malty liquids, I’d like to leave you off with my brief impressions of a couple beers that were on tap for the day. Though the variety and amount of beer available is still on the lighter side due to the opening, I want to point out that the styles produced here just so happen to be beers you’d want to drink several glasses of anyway.
The Küsterer Original Weissbier is a pretty little weizen that is indeed quite hazy and a deep amber in color. A white head sits on top and takes its time disintegrating in my glass. Bread and lemon are the most prominent flavors and aroma. A hint of clove lingers in the background of this traditional and comforting beer.
Cedar Springs Brewing
Cedar Springs Yinzers Roundabout IPA was a collaboration beer with Roundabout Brewing from Pittsburgh. This clear and burnished gold colored IPA was quite well balanced and thirst-quenching for an American style IPA. It provided light floral and honey notes along with a layered bready character that binds it all together. It’s pleasantly and balancing-ly bitter throughout, though that’s not the defining feature of the brew. The malt provides a bread-like sweetness that balances the almost European-esque display of hops, though I know the varieties used actually originate from New Zealand and the United States. Overall it’s a pretty beer that lends plenty of opportunity for pairing in the future.
Cedar Springs is now home to a 15-barrel system brewery that is owned by David Ringler and hasbrewing operations run by head brewer, Matt Peterson, previously of Schlafly Beer of St. Louis. It appears to me that they have a long and wonderful road ahead of them, despite the normal hiccups of any new operation. I was delighted to make an appearance and I’m already parched sitting here thinking about that Weissbier. Should you see me in the brewery on my next visit, please join me at my table for a well deserved “Prost!” to Cedar Springs Brewing Company.
 

German Translation: Grand Opening Celebration

CEDAR SPRINGS – Cedar Springs Brewing Company, a German-inspired, family-friendly microbrewery will soon be warming the heart of Main Street in Cedar Springs.

The brewery’s grand opening celebration will begin on Friday, Nov. 13 at 1 p.m. with a ribbon cutting and ceremonial first pour.

The festivities will continue throughout the weekend as they unveil the full menu for the first time. While Head Chef and “Curator of Culinary Creation” Shaun Wooden’s main focus will be traditional Bavarian cuisine, the menu will feature a wide variety of food, including a kid’s menu. Once inside, Grand Rapids natives may recognize panels from the former downtown Schnitzelbank restaurant within the microbrewery walls; a nod to the rich German history within Beer City.

The microbrewery will offer a unique bar menu featuring Lagers, Pilsners, Hefeweizens, Pale Ales… oh my! alongside Cedar Cider and Vino131 Wine. For the under-21 group and drivers among us, Cedar Springs Brewing is also offering Old Cedar Creek soda, which includes almost as many flavors as the styles on their beer tap list. The tap list will be updated in real-time on their Facebook page, complete with information on how much of each style of beer is actually left, thanks to the wonderful world of technology – and digitalpour.com

Cedar Springs Brewing’s Head Brewer and “Barley, Malt and Hops Wrangler” Matt Peterson is utilizing traditional German open-fermentation methods to brew Lagers, and will also brew Ales on their 15-barrel brew system with a capacity of 1500 barrels per year. The brewing system didn’t have far to travel, as it came from Psycho Brew out of Belding, Michigan.

In the spring, a Bier Garden will feature a brick patio with trees and tables that will expand seating and face the White Pine Trail, greeting runners, bikers, and even snowmobilers in the winter.

Since Owner and ”Director of Happiness” David Ringler broke ground on this authentic German microbrewery back in October 2014, his goal remains the same: to be a family-friendly, laid-back restaurant, and microbrewery for the community of Cedar Springs—a place where friends can get together to enjoy a meal and a beer after a sporting event, or heading in or out of Beer City, Grand Rapids.

Cedar Springs Brewing Company is located at 95 North Main Street in Cedar Springs.

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