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prolonged enjoyment shorts

prolonged enjoyment shorts

It’s certainly not the clearest looking IPA I’ve encountered, but great lacing with a medium-sized frothy head begs me closer. The beer is almost a muddied amber color, and looks great in the glass. I am being invited to take another slug from this “Prolonged Enjoyment” Session India Pale Ale from Short’s Brewing.

It’s a staple nowadays, these session IPA’s, as we leap into the freshness of the spring season and allow ourselves more of the quaffable beers out there to combat the newfound warmth and sweat that comes with preparing everything for the hot days ahead.

In Prolonged Enjoyment, a mildly fruity smell, almost grape and strawberry-like, wafts up and balances alongside the sesame seed and cracker notes of the malt. It’s a bit bready as well, with a deep, danker, greener note mixed in coming from those hops. The aroma entangles itself with these characteristics and leave you presented with a mild but pleasant smell. It reminds me of the scent I get when walking past a brewery in production.

prolonged enjoyment shortsThe beer is unpretentious and certainly quaffable. The flavor dissolves into a plethora of green character with a touch of spiciness from the hops. It’s the kind of flavor that, when exhaling, you feel like your mouth smells like hops are being ripped open inside of it. The mild breadiness of the malt and the casual overall spiciness breezes by the in background, and the brew leaves you feeling a dry finish and a snappy bitter bite. All I can do is say, “Ahhhhhhhhhh” and reach back for another pull from the glass.

Drink up responsibly and enjoy these relaxing days ahead with this beer in hand for those moments when you just want to refresh yourself in an unhurried manner. Prolonged Enjoyment will then be able to live up to its name for you.

 

Cheers!

 

halloween

Are you about to eat some of the worst Halloween candy? Do you have kids who gave you all the crap they don’t want after pillaging the neighborhood? Are your pockets filled with terrible treats you drunkenly took from that bowl at the party? Did you encounter old people who insisted you not leave until you’ve taken a piece with you? Are you worried about what to do next with your undesirable treats?

MittenBrew’s got your back. Just pair the worst Halloween candy with beer!

halloweencandy-4I think we all know this first culprit: candy corn. This last resort in a candy dish is this unenticing looking kernel, whose only credibility stands on the fact that if you stack up all the kernels, it looks like an ear of corn. When pairing it with beer, the best way to choke your way through it is with Tapistry Brewing Company’s Mr. Orange, their Witbier brewed with blood oranges, chamomile, and rose hips. The soft nature from the wheat malt in the beer will coax out the slight marshmallow like quality of the candy corn. Now that this base of mallow sweetness is established, the chamomile and rose hips can be featured and shine through, thus enhancing the experience and creating more complexity. Starting to feel fancy yet?

halloweencandy-2

You remember that Bazooka Bubble gum and how it loses flavor within 15 seconds of chewing it?
No problem for us. The best thing to pair with something that loses its flavor entirely, is yet another thing that has next to no flavor—Natty Light anyone? No, in all seriousness, just spit the damn thing out and take a big step up and drink
Our Brewing Company’s Vienna Lager as you cheers to Bazooka Joe instead. Maybe buy him a beer too, because his wrapper comics blow (get it?) just as much as his bubble gum so he probably needs it.

halloweencandy-5Circus Peanuts have a weird, marshmallow banana flavor and soft texture that I think can only be tamed by coating it with Roak’s Devil Dog Oatmeal Stout. The banana flavor finds companionship in the beer’s roasty bitterness and bready burnt toast notes, making it almost taste like some sort of chocolatey banana baked dessert. Plus, part of the proceeds for the beer go towards a local VA hospital in Detroit. Now you can genuinely feel good about eating this candy, so long as you steer clear of eating it on its own…

halloweencandy-1I know this one is rated low on Halloween candy lists, but I personally love this stuff, besides the fact that I feel like I might choke to death every time I have one. Those hard Butterscotch Candies that make you feel like you’re at your grandma’s house create a fun pairing with the Cranker’s Coconut Porter. There’s just something about chocolate, butterscotch, and coconut that really make the palate sing.

Black Jelly Bhalloweencandy-3eans are ominous looking. More of an acquired taste, it’s not exactly a crowd pleaser amidst all the super sugary, waxy chocolate covered, non-complex candies out there. Perhaps Short’s would resurrect their Black Licorice Lager for it? But in the meantime, I’ll settle for pairing these unfavorable beans with an appropriately spice-forward Grand Pumpkin from Harmony Brewing. It’s brewed with pumpkin, chai tea spices, ginger root, cinnamon bark, darjeeling tea, cardamom pods, nutmeg, clove, and vanilla beans. The multitude of spices and herbs together can now combine with the black licorice notes of the jelly beans to create a sweeter, more harmonized pairing with plenty of complexity.

(P.S. I recommend bringing your unwanted Good & Plenty to this anise party too.)

I choose Dots candy with Jolly Pumpkin’s La Roja for our next pairing. Partly because this candy is fruity, and partly because this beer is sour, but mostly because this candy tastes awful and I need a powerful, funky, tart cherry, balsamic-like, Flanders sour to wash it down. You’re welcome.

halloweencandy-8

Candy buttons. They confusingly don’t look like candy, their flavor is lackluster, and each button comes with a piece of paper stuck on it. What’s not to love, right? Love it even harder, as you pair this sheet of sadness with Latitude 42’s very own Nectar of the Goddess, which is a blood orange and passion fruit, honey-infused wheat beer. Just pop in a button, take a sip of beer, pop another button, take another sip of beer…and soon enough you’ve got an inebriated sugar buzz to prepare you for handing out candy to strangers. The softness from the wheat, and the sweetness from the honey align with the sweet candy, while the passion fruit and blood orange characteristics resonate with the artificial “fruitiness” of these bizarre buttons.

halloweencandy-6Taffy candy never really reveals its flavor due to the opaque wrapper, but insteads shrouds itself in mystery by only revealing its Halloween themed wrapping. What’s inside? Untrustworthy taffy candy of course! What better beer to pair with an unknown, chalky, chewy, kind of fruitiness than Rockford Brewing’s Michigan Weisse! Their take on a German style Berliner Weisse, lends tasting notes of banana, pear, and clove, that combined with its slightly tart character, will quell any further disappointment caused by dear, sweet mystery taffy.

Mints. Do you think I just came back from dinner or are you simply trying to tell me something? These “candies” make such a heartbreaking “thunk” when dropped into the candy bucket, but at least you’ll have something to aid your foul beer breath before you unleash it on the person you were about to talk to. However, since this is a place for pairing, do the traditional ‘mint and chocolate’ route by eating these with Dark Horse’s Plead The 5th Imperial Stout to cap off your night.

halloween

 

Beer pairs with all, so don’t underestimate the power of boozy goodness on top of sugary, sweet sadness to make a perfectly palatable night. It can change a meal, make or break a pairing, and can now officially resurrect your Halloween. Eating copious amounts of sugar for no real reason never felt so good!

bitter old fecker

bitter old feckerBitter Old Fecker Rustic Ales has brewed an IPA with chamomile, rose petals, and juniper. They then barrel-aged it and put it out in the world for us to enjoy.

The beer is a cool burnt orange color with barely a head sitting on top. It’s certainly cloudy, which makes sense seeing as how they have a note on the side of the bottle saying, “We don’t use filters or fining agents. Our ale is hazy. We like it that way.”.

Upon inhalation of the aroma, I’m reminded of the last days of summer, just as you start smelling the turn of the leaves for autumn. I smell notes of fleshy blood oranges, orange peel, graham cracker, and wood.

The mouthfeel lends a softness, fullness, and bitterness that all marry together well. I’m left with the taste of wood, a dryness at the top of my tongue, and a spicy prickle as though I’ve just eaten something with black pepper.

As it warms and I return to the aromatics, the chamomile rises up, followed by a minor note of the juniper as it attaches itself to the “woodiness” of it all.

Bright, acidic, drying, and incredibly soft, this beer is a delightful treat that can be enjoyed with dinner, served as a dessert by itself, or paired with a cigar, with my recommendation for this being the Corojo from Leaf by Oscar.

leaders beverage

Since retiring in 2010 after 22 years of service in the Army, leaving active duty in the ranks of Major and as a Black Hawk helicopter pilot, Drew Larson has rigorously dedicated himself to the craft beverage industry with the same precision that was required of him in the military. The story of how Larson is challenging the industry to evolve will soon have an affect on West Michigan’s beer scene.  

Larson attended Kendall College in Chicago, where he earned a degree in culinary arts. It was a fitting complement to the passion for food and beverage he developed traveling abroad in the service. For a business project during his undergrad, Larson conceptualized Leaders Consulting—a consultancy to the food and beverage industry that would be the precursor to Leaders Beverage.

Fascinated by what he was exposed to internationally, coupled with over a decade of homebrewing experience, Larson honed in his sights on his next mission—craft beer. In tandem with becoming a Certified Cicerone® and Certified Sommelier, as well as conquering the Master Draft Certification programs at Siebel Institute of Technology and Micro Matic, Larson was promoted to beverage director at Hopleaf. It took less than two years of Larson managing one of the most well known and respected draft accounts in the country before word of mouth spread. Soon other establishments who cared about the quality of their draft beer came calling to employ his expertise.

leaders beverage

Hopleaf supported Larson in branching out to secure a waiting list of clients who needed his help. However, in order play nice with Illinois state law, Larson needed to incorporate. Larson officially founded Leaders Beverage in late 2014 by simply refining the idea he had previously submitted as a class assignment.

Larson has draft lines for veins, and Leaders Beverage is the heart that pumps the beer that flows through them.

leaders beverageThe man was born to be a leader, and is now raising the bar for the industry—elevating the standards for quality and service of craft beer beyond expectation. Larson clearly wants to set Leaders Beverage apart from the competition. He works to ensure that they’re providing more value for their customers than simply going through the motions just to collect on an anonymous bi-weekly invoice.

Larson demands as much from his customers as they should of his company, only managing venues that “want to stand out as having the highest level of draft quality.” Larson shoots straight with new potential business, “When you hire us, you’re not replacing your current beer line cleaning service with another — what you’d be doing is taking on a draft system management service,” said Larson.

Whether it’s Larson himself, or a personal consultant he assigns to each account, Leaders Beverage is on call 24/7. It’s important to Larson that he and his team of Leaders are present, recognized, and accessible to their customers. “Of course, one component of what we do is draft line cleaning, which we do at a much higher level, but we’re actively engaged in managing how your beer pours because that’s your profitability,” said Larson.

Larson’s value proposition to their customers is to create revenue for them that outweighs the difference between the investment in hiring Leaders Beverage and what’s usually a discounted fee from the competition. He can accomplish this because he’s systematic and doesn’t cut corners. When asked about how he approaches addressing issues in the field, Larson’s integrity for doing right by his customers never waivers, “If there is a proper way you’re supposed to do [something], I don’t deviate until I know enough to improve it. I’m not going to deviate toward a lesser degree, ever.”

Angela Steil, MittenBrew staff writer, attests to Larson’s commitment, “The way he conducts himself and operates his company speaks volumes about how he approaches business.” Also a Certified Cicerone®, Micro Matic Draft System expert, and all-around beer badass, Steil has been consulting for Leaders Beverage since 2015. Recently, she was promoted to Grand Rapids Chapter President, which hints at Larson’s next move.  

The goal of every account Larson touches is to develop their system to be Certified Clean, and he plans to bring that standard from Chicagoland to West Michigan by the end of 2016. Steil’s palate can spot an off beer from a mile away. She has witnessed Leaders Beverage’s track record for success, and is optimistic about their forthcoming presence in and contribution to Beer City USA, “There really isn’t anyone else I’d recommend.”

leaders beverage“We put our name on every single beer that comes out of any draft system we’re involved with. As far as I’m concerned, every pint has my name on it, and if anything’s wrong with it, it’s on me,” said Larson. He’s proud of the fact that he’s even stopped brewers in their tracks while watching them drink their own beer for the first time on a draft system he’s built or maintained. “Brewers are humbled by the way their beer tastes at on-premise accounts when they realize that their beer matters to me, too,” said Larson. Larson isn’t shy about the elite reputation he’s helped his customers earn, “People know when they see the list of accounts with our name on them, they’re the best places to drink, period.”

As Michigan is a state without any formal draft system laws to regulate quality or standards for cleanliness, it’s all too easy for accounts to operate according to an archaic philosophy with draft technology and practices that are decades old. Larson is eager to build a clientele who will get the support they deserve. The consumer is getting smarter and demanding better, which is pushing the industry to be more responsible with the product they’re providing. Both sides are desperate for a higher level of service. As Larson continues exposing draft’s dirty little secrets, unkept systems of yesterday are doomed, making way for what he hopes is a “better draft beer for a brighter, tastier tomorrow.”

 

shorts brewing

Short’s Brewing Company

Nicie – An American Wheat Ale Brewed with Orange Zest, Lemon Zest, Coriander, and Peppercorn

It is certainly hazy, but not cloudy. It is certainly golden, but with more of a yellow brightness. It certainly has a fluffy looking white head, but it’s not stacked up high in your glass. Before me is a beer that looks like summer and I’m delighted to partake.

My first thought when sipping became, “Zesty indeed!” As an American-style wheat ale, Nicie gets its kick from both the orange and lemon zest, with the added underbelly of coriander and peppercorn to lift it further. The coriander is oh-so-wonderful in particular with the orange zest notes in the flavor.

shorts brewing

The nose is a bit more mysterious as it only really emits the coriander and stronger peppercorn notes. The spicing  almost gives me the impression of sniffing a meal. Though it doesn’t exactly smell “savory,” the spices lean towards that end of the aroma spectrum.

As I swirl I can hear the carbonation rise up near my face and fizzle at me. Swallowing the beer gives me the eerie impression that I’ve drunk more in one swallow than I had originally intended. The flavors start out strong until you begin the swallowing process and the spritz and zest and wheat smoothness takes over to create a quaffable beer. The carbonation levels feel as though I get a zip along my tongue, but at the same time I don’t have to worry about the constant urge to belch in 10 minutes.

The dosing of the spices is truly magnificent, and I’m finding myself enjoying this beer more and more by the minute. When I think of an American Wheat, this is what I’d hope for (granted I know they have added more spices than in a traditional American wheat) and it feels like a pleasant blend between an American style wheat beer and a Belgian Witbier—in color, carbonation levels, and flavor.

shorts brewingWhy yes, I WOULD pair this little brew with food. A filet of a mild fish such as Mahi Mahi would be stellar, and I’d even take a guess that this beer would fit nicely with pistachio ice cream, using the cream to cut the peppercorn spice. The salty pistachios would lend their saltiness to the beer, giving it an almost Gose beer style kind of enhancement.

To top it all off, the Montecristo White Series cigar would be a fine cigar choice to pair with this brew. Using the orange zest and the peppercorn notes of Nicie to meld with the distinctive woodiness and hint of peppercorn notes of the Montecristo White, the imbiber would find a refreshing, yet complementary, experience.

 

shorts brewing

Short’s Brewing Company
Nicie – An American Wheat Ale Brewed with Orange Zest, Lemon Zest, Coriander, and Peppercorn
It is certainly hazy, but not cloudy. It is certainly golden, but with more of a yellow brightness. It certainly has a fluffy looking white head, but it’s not stacked up high in your glass. Before me is a beer that looks like summer and I’m delighted to partake.
My first thought when sipping became, “Zesty indeed!” As an American-style wheat ale, Nicie gets its kick from both the orange and lemon zest, with the added underbelly of coriander and peppercorn to lift it further. The coriander is oh-so-wonderful in particular with the orange zest notes in the flavor.
shorts brewing
The nose is a bit more mysterious as it only really emits the coriander and stronger peppercorn notes. The spicing  almost gives me the impression of sniffing a meal. Though it doesn’t exactly smell “savory,” the spices lean towards that end of the aroma spectrum.
As I swirl I can hear the carbonation rise up near my face and fizzle at me. Swallowing the beer gives me the eerie impression that I’ve drunk more in one swallow than I had originally intended. The flavors start out strong until you begin the swallowing process and the spritz and zest and wheat smoothness takes over to create a quaffable beer. The carbonation levels feel as though I get a zip along my tongue, but at the same time I don’t have to worry about the constant urge to belch in 10 minutes.
The dosing of the spices is truly magnificent, and I’m finding myself enjoying this beer more and more by the minute. When I think of an American Wheat, this is what I’d hope for (granted I know they have added more spices than in a traditional American wheat) and it feels like a pleasant blend between an American style wheat beer and a Belgian Witbier—in color, carbonation levels, and flavor.
shorts brewingWhy yes, I WOULD pair this little brew with food. A filet of a mild fish such as Mahi Mahi would be stellar, and I’d even take a guess that this beer would fit nicely with pistachio ice cream, using the cream to cut the peppercorn spice. The salty pistachios would lend their saltiness to the beer, giving it an almost Gose beer style kind of enhancement.
To top it all off, the Montecristo White Series cigar would be a fine cigar choice to pair with this brew. Using the orange zest and the peppercorn notes of Nicie to meld with the distinctive woodiness and hint of peppercorn notes of the Montecristo White, the imbiber would find a refreshing, yet complementary, experience.
 

trail point brewing

Trail Point is, dare I say, on the right path.

Walking into the brewery for my first time I immediately, genuinely, feel at home. From the driftwood tap handles to the outdoor patio, to the high ceilings and the tucked away dart board, the whole place had a vibe that encouraged the act of sitting for hours with friends and passing the time with beer and games.

Fortunately, I had the opportunity to relax in their beautiful space and try out a few of their brews.

trail point brewing

First up? CIPaPotamus, a 6.4% ABV Citra India Pale Ale. Clever name. I’m into it already.

Before me is the epitome of an amber colored beer. A thin ring of a white head sits on the outer edges of the glass. As I lift the snifter up to my nose I’m greeted with melded aromatics of sweet orange peel, toasted grains, a touch of honey, peppery hops, and a soothing floral note. Already intrigued, I bring the glass up to my mouth and take in the soul of the beer. I’m rewarded with tasting notes reminiscent of the aroma — light honey, sweet orange peel, and the comforting flavor of toasted grains.

On my tongue the beer feels balanced, refreshing, and leaves me with a hint of sweetness of honey and malt to soothe the prickling hop bitterness. When lingering in its aftermath I am reminded of the crisp, herbal bitterness I enjoy when sipping a Negroni as an aperitif before a meal.

A Toasted Brunette comes my way next at 5.5% ABV in its Coconut Brown Ale form. Before you ask — yes they did use real coconut. Yes, it was toasted in house and was added in all its beautiful glory into their beer. Yes, this beer is like drinking alcoholic coconut oil dripped onto a piece of bread.

The beer is almost opaque and reminds me of the color a Belgian Dubbel normally takes on. The head is an off white and lingers.

Aromatics are of, you guessed it, toasted coconut. Honestly that is most of the aroma, save for a touch of raisin and a whiff of alcohol heat. Might I say it even reminds me of the fresh scent of wood? Personally, I think it would be absolutely divine if the beer was aged on cedar, because I feel its bouquet would respond so wonderfully to it.

The flavor is encompassed by coconut and the toasted character from the toasting of the coconuts, as well as the grain bill melding together. I wouldn’t say this beer is sweet, but rather lends flavor that would contrast and emphasize sweet foods. I kept thinking of eating a sweet or savory flan while drinking it. The mouthfeel was thinner than I had anticipated but the finish left me with a last burst of coconut and lingering, balancing bitterness to tie it all together.

Henry Lee is up next for me! At 8.9% ABV, this sneakily mid-high alcohol strength Strong Old Ale was a peculiar brew.

It’s perfectly clear with a bone colored head that takes some time to dissipate. The scent is surprisingly subtle and gently grows. Eventually I pick apart earthy hop aromatics, subtle buttered biscuit and overall breadiness, and an interesting dark cherry note. When tasting, the subtlety continues along using the bready malt, a comforting and appropriate bit of diacetyl, and earthy English style hops, leaving a small twinge of hop bitterness at the end.

The mouthfeel is slicker and leaves me with some alcohol heat, though it’s sneaky in a way that if I was tasting this beer blind I would have guessed it to be at about 7% ABV instead of its true 8.9%. A brief sweetness latches to the alcohol warmth and carries into the finish where it all ends up attaching to the friendly diacetyl-like buttered biscuit flavors. The more I drink it, the more I realize it’s almost begging for food. Most of the time I find Old Ales to be great sipping beers on their own but with the more subtle nature of the Henry Lee I feel it deserves a meal.

trail point brewing

Last but not least was the Sun Tap’d Summer Wheat Ale that comes in at 4.5% ABV. I’ve never had a wheat beer like this one before. Claimed as an American style wheat, the ale is brewed with torrified wheat, white wheat, and rahr, among other grains. The combination created quite a bizarre beer that I won’t forget.

The brew is clear with a quickly disappearing head. In the aroma I detect strong hop aromatics reminiscent of light onion, and an earthy twig/leafy character. I dig into the tasting and discover a surprising yet not unpleasant burnt non-buttered popcorn flavor, along with the aforementioned hop characteristics. The beer is thinner and drier and grittier than I usually get when drinking a wheat beer. The flavors and aromas of the grain actually remind me of the use of rye in a grain bill and if I had been blind tasting I wouldn’t have guessed this was made with wheat.

I finish it all up in its crisp, refreshing, barely bitter state and announce this whole experience as quite fulfilling.

Well, what’s next? For me, I’ll be coming back in sooner than later to destroy my husband in a game of darts in their taproom, and I’d suggest you all a.) do the same and visit the venue, and b.) attend one of the many beer dinners put on by Trail Point with Patty Matters food truck. I can’t see how that would ever be a poor decision.

Cheers!

 

Photography: Steph Harding

batch brewing

Detroit is the home of Batch Brewing, a culinary and fermentation loving brewery that is a gem for the east side city.

I had the pleasure of tasting a couple of their beers and wanted to share my tasting notes with you all.

Anton’s Animal’s II is a Berliner Weisse, which had me excited (yet skeptical) at first, because everyone and their mother is brewing some sort of sour beer and things can go wrong quickly when diving into this realm of suds. So? What did Batch have in store for me?

batch brewing

It was a very cloudy beer. It’s color reminded me of tan/yellowish grapefruit peel. Muted and pale yellow, the beer looked like the style I was expecting. The head left me rather quickly and morphed into a ring of bubbles on the outer edges of the glass.

Curious, I sniff the “Animal’s” and first get a brief whiff of a grassy aroma before the citrus element, which serves as a sort of aromatic backbone, sets in. Nectarine skin, brioche bread, and a floral note reminiscent of honeysuckle breezes past my nostrils as I sit and take my slow breaths and fill my face with beer scent. Delicious smelling I’d say.

Though I know this wasn’t brewed with coriander, the aromas of that particular spice dart out at times, adding another layer to the beer. Overripe, sweet lemon and under ripe grapefruit notes linger throughout.

I sip the beer and it’s so pleasant. The floral note rides up first, hand in hand with the bright acidity. That under ripe grapefruit and nectarine skin notes I mentioned? They appear in the flavor as well, just before bready notes take over and dominate the finish. This isn’t to say the beer tastes “strong”, but rather the malt notes take over in a way that wasn’t present in the aroma. I’m reminded of brioche bread once again and of eating crackers, which is attributed to the addition of wheat in the grain bill. These strong malt characteristics in particular make it a good food pairing beer.

As expected, this beer is very bright to start but thankfully reduces itself into a simply refreshing beer with background acidity that spritzes up the beer and leaves me feeling a little twinge of sour in my cheeks.

At the brewery, the lovely bartenders there will gladly serve their house-made Blueberry Anise Hyssop syrup into your “Animal’s” Berliner Weisse, should you desire it. I’d suggest trying it both with and without the syrup to compare, which means getting two beers.

Yes, I’m giving you drinking homework.

Ready for the big guns? Batch decided to make sure you needed a DD by producing the big and boozy Antwerp’s Placebo II — a Belgian Strong Dark clocking in at a whopping 15.4% ABV.

batch brewing

The beer is mostly clear and hickory in color with bright red highlights. Next to no head is left for me as it’s dissipated almost immediately. Did the alcohol break down the proteins for it?

Strong sweet plum, raisin, and an “almost burn your nose hair” kind of alcohol aroma wafts forth. I’m actually reminded of Twizzlers candy, so a licorice note is appropriate I’d say. Luxardo and black cherries also come to mind, as well as unripe blackberries.

It tastes like it smells in that the sweet raisin, licorice, and hot alcohol notes all came back for me. The alcoholic nature is startling, but not taking me away from wanting to drink it. You know, this beer reminds me of eating a sweet bread pudding! I love that stuff. Maraschino cherry and the luxardo cherry notes become more prominent as it warms up.

The mouth-feel is as expected. It’s a hot beer due to the alcohol, and it’s sweetness slides across my tongue. It feels big and bold, that’s for sure. In the end I’m left with an aftertaste of cherries, bread pudding, and a recurring “whiskey shivers” effect.

Batch Brewing, you’ve peaked my interest. Will I ingest more of their beer? You bet. Do I think you, dear reader, should as well? Absolutely. Get out to their taproom to taste through their selection and be sure to grab a glass of their “feel good” beer of the month as well, which donates $2 from every sale to a local nonprofit. I understand why they call it “feel good,” because this concept is really rad. For more details, check it out here.

 

Photography: Steph Harding


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