gabf20

272 medals awarded to 240 breweries in prestigious professional beer competition

Boulder, Colo. • October 16, 2020 — The Brewers Association (BA) awarded 272 medals* to 240 breweries across the country during the 2020 Great American Beer Festival (GABF) competition awards ceremony. The best beers in 91 beer categories covering 170 different beer styles (including all subcategories) were awarded gold, silver, and bronze medals during a virtual ceremony hosted on The Brewing Network.

Judges for the 34th edition of the celebrated competition evaluated 8,806 entries from 1,720 breweries from all 50 states plus Washington, D.C. Socially distanced judging took place in 35 sessions over 18 days with strict safety measures in place. The awards ceremony was held virtually on Friday evening, kicking off the two-day online programming portion of the Great American Beer Festival.

“This year’s GABF competition may have looked a little different, but the beers entered into the competition were as impressive and innovative as ever,” said Chris Swersey, competition manager, Great American Beer Festival. “This has arguably been one of the most challenging years breweries have ever faced, so we hope these awards serve as a symbol not only of brewing excellence but also the resiliency of the craft brewing community as a whole.”

View the 2020 winners or download a PDF list of the winners.

GABF COMPETITION STATISTICS

  • 34th edition of the GABF competition
  • 8,806 beers judged
  • 1,720 breweries in the competition from all 50 states plus Washington, D.C.
  • 115 judges from 21 states
  • Average number of competition beers entered in each category: 97
  • Category with the highest number of entries: Juicy or Hazy India Pale Ale (377)
  • 272 total medals awarded
  • 240 medal-winning breweries
  • 337 first-time GABF entrants
  • 19 first-time GABF winners

 

MOST-ENTERED STYLE CATEGORIES

The winners of the top five most-entered categories were:

Category 58: Juicy or Hazy India Pale Ale (377 entries) – Sponsored by The Cincinnati Insurance Companies 

GOLD: Spellbinder, Wren House Brewing Co., Phoenix, AZ

SILVER: Yojo, Moonraker Brewing Co., Auburn, CA

BRONZE: Wicked Pawesome, Metazoa Brewing Co. – Stringtown Production Facility, Indianapolis, IN

 

Category 57: American Style India Pale Ale (355 entries) – Sponsored by The Ardagh Group 

GOLD: IPA, Perry Street Brewing, Spokane, WA

SILVER: Updrift India Pale Ale, Pelican Brewing Co. – Tillamook, Tillamook, OR

BRONZE: Nothing Noble, Von Ebert Brewing – Pearl, Portland, OR

 

Category 39: German Style Pilsener (200 entries) – Sponsored by Micro Matic 

GOLD: Sprockets, Gravely Brewing Co., Louisville, KY

SILVER: Prost Pils, Prost Brewing Co., Denver, CO

BRONZE: Pils, Kansas City Bier Co., Kansas City, MO

 

Category 28: Wood & Barrel-Aged Strong Stout (199 entries) – Sponsored by BeerHole 

GOLD: A Night to End All Dawns, Kane Brewing Co., Ocean, NJ

SILVER: Ruckus, Melvin Brewing – Thai Me Up, Jackson, WY

BRONZE: Grasp of Oak, Moksa Brewing Co., Rocklin, CA

 

Category 60: Juicy or Hazy Imperial India Pale Ale (192 entries) – Sponsored by The Alison Group 

GOLD: The Hopsplainer, Burke-Gilman Brewing Co., Seattle, WA

SILVER: Not A Scientist, Cloudburst Brewing, Seattle, WA

BRONZE: Sugar on My Tongue, Highland Park Brewery, Los Angeles, CA

 

MOST MEDALED BREWERIES

The most medals won by individual breweries included:

Sun King Brewery – Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN – 4 medals 

GOLD – Afternoon Delight, Category 26 – Wood- and Barrel-Aged Beer

BRONZE – Cherry Busey, Category 30 – Fruited Wood- and Barrel-Aged Sour Beer

BRONZE – Pachanga, Category 34 – Light Lager

BRONZE – Sunlight Cream Ale, Category 49 – Golden or Blonde Ale

 

Cannonball Creek Brewing Co., Golden, CO – 3 medals 

GOLD – Featherweight Pale Ale, Category 53 – American-Style Pale Ale

BRONZE – Vladimir Brutin, Category 18 – Experimental India Pale Ale

BRONZE – Let’s Talk About Mex, Category 37 – American-Style Cream Ale

 

Chuckanut Brewery – North Nut, Bellingham, WA – 3 medals 

GOLD – Chuckanut Maibock, Category 47 – Bock

SILVER – Chuckanut Chuck Lite, Category 34 – Light Lager

BRONZE – Chuckanut Rye, Category 12 – Rye Beer

 

Riip Beer Co., Huntington Beach, CA – 3 medals 

GOLD – Tangible Passion, Category 82 – Belgian-Style Specialty Ale

SILVER – The Riizzo, Category 10 – Coffee Stout or Porter

SILVER – Black the Riipper, Category 69 – American-Style Black Ale or American-Style Stout

 

23 individual breweries won 2 medals

213 individual breweries won 1 medal

 

BREWERY AND BREWPUB OF THE YEAR AWARDS

(See criteria here)

PACKAGING BREWERIES:

Very Small Brewing Company of the Year – Sponsored by Brewers Supply Group 

<1,000 barrels produced in 2019 

Five Branches Brewing, Tarpon Springs, FL; Jerry Brown

 

Small Brewing Company of the Year – Sponsored by ABS Commercial 

1,000 – 14,999 barrels produced in 2019 

Big aLICe Brewing Co., Long Island City, NY; Big aLICe Production Team

 

Mid-Size Brewing Company of the Year – Sponsored by MicroStar Logistics 

15,000 – 6,000,000 barrels produced in 2019 

Lost Forty Brewing, Little Rock, AR; Lost Forty Brewing Team

 

BREWPUBS:

Small Brewpub of the Year – Sponsored by Briess Malt & Ingredients Co. 

<750 barrels produced in 2019 

The Good Society, Seattle, WA; Phil Cammarano & Nick Berger

 

Mid-Size Brewpub of the Year – Sponsored by Brewers Supply Group 

750 – 1,500 barrels produced in 2019 

Monkless Belgian Ales, Bend, OR; Todd Clement & Chris Dinsdale

 

Large Brewpub of the Year – Sponsored by Ska Fabricating 

Over 1,500 barrels produced in 2019 

The Freehouse, Minneapolis, MN; The Freehouse Team

 

LARGE BREWERIES AND MULTIPLE LOCATION BREWERIES:

Brewery Group of the Year – Sponsored by Live Oak Bank 

Over 6,000,000 barrels produced in 2019 or multi-location breweries wishing to compete as a group 

Three Creeks Brewing Co., Sisters, OR; Team Three Creeks

 

run the jewels

The quadruple can release consists of three Double Dry Hopped Double IPAs and a fruited sour

Grand Rapids, Mich. — During quarantine, Run the Jewels, rap’s marquee MC/producer duo, dropped “RTJ4,” an incendiary album of front to back bangers that could rile the staunchest couch potato to riot. For Ed Collazo, CEO at City Built Brewing Company, their music fueled his work and inspired The Crown Series, a set of IPAs and a sour sure to impress hip-hop fans and hopheads alike.

The a-ha moment came when Collazo was listening to “Crown”, a track from the duo’s second album where MC Killer Mike exhumes the baggage that’s kept him from reaching his full potential.

“What attracted me to the song was a lyric, ‘You can’t pick up no crown, holding what’s holding you down.’ There’s a lot of truth to that,” Collazo said. “Then I started to really listen to the lyrics and found some great IPA names.”

Into the Fray, Into the Haze and Into the Murk are the names Collazo selected from the lyrics—pretty fitting for describing turbid beer.

Rob Qualls, head brewer at City Built, never listened to Run the Jewels before brewing these beers, but he happened to match the duo’s tendency for lavishness and excess with high-budget hop bills for each IPA.

“I wanted to spend all the money on all the fancy hops we could,” Qualls said. “The way I look at it, the malt bill might be the car but it means nothing if there’s not an engine behind there driving.”

Into the Fray is packed with Galaxy, Into the Murk with Nelson Sauvin and a dash of Idaho 7 and Into the Haze with all the boutique hops—Citra, Cryo Simcoe and Amarillo. To the New England detractors who knock hazies for their supposed sameness, trying these IPAs side-by-side reveals the spectrum of flavors possible for the style. Buy each individually for $23 a 4-pack to taste the variety.

The oddball in the series is Childish Obsession, a fruited sour with tangerine puree, vanilla and lactose. The flavor evokes such childhood indulgences as push-pops and Sunny D. Snag 4-packs for $20 each. All cans will be available for purchase first to mug clubbers on 8/27, and to the public on 8/28.

For the cans, Collazo tapped Grand Rapids locals Kyle DeGroff and Elliot Chaltry to create the most eye-popping art imaginable. You may have recognized their work while driving through the Creston neighborhood, where their large scale murals invigorate city blocks. Here they’ve shrunk their canvas from buildings to cans, but their work retains the same sense of panoramic detail. Each can pays respect to a different Run the Jewels album, creating characters inspired by the iconic hands on each cover.

As a lifelong hip-hop fan, Collazo was thrilled to bring this tribute to life.

“I grew up listening to a lot of groups that probably inspired Run the Jewels—Tribe, Wu-Tang,” Collazo said. “We have another beer we named after Del the Funkee Homosapien called Bob Dobalina.”

This series perfectly translates the bombast of Run the Jewels into beer that would make Killer Mike and El-P proud.

covid-19

COVID-19 began as an abstract. It was something happening across the world, but not here in Michigan, or even the United States. It was murmurs and rumors and hand washing.

And then March 16 came and everything changed with a quick, decisive snap when Governor Gretchen Whitmer closed all dine-in service for bars and restaurants across the entire state of Michigan. I went from being a full-time Sales Representative for Beards Brewery to a question mark—and I was not the only one. Here’s a peek into our COVID-19 story:

covid-19

Emily Hengstebeck

Beards Brewery sits at the very entrance of Downtown Petoskey overlooking Little Traverse Bay. The pub and restaurant’s capacity is over 300 with our outdoor patio included, and we offer a full menu of food, beer, cider, and soda. We host local musicians and organize a monthly concert series as well. Needless to say, we are well-practiced and used to managing large crowds and thirsty customers. 

When all of that became a moot point our management team took quick, decisive action. For our small business to survive, we immediately changed our dine-in model to a takeout and delivery model staffed by a skeleton crew, while a majority of employees were temporarily laid off. 

“We were forced to become more flexible,” says Peter Manthei, co-owner and co-founder of Beards. 

“Restaurants and any business in hospitality are financial acrobats,” says Ben Slocum, the other co-owner and co-founder of Beards. “Most are living at tight levels of cash flow margin—enough for a few weeks and that’s it.”

With COVID-19 making the cash flow margins even tighter, Beards executed To Go & Delivery within just a few days after the dine-in shutdown. And I can say a lot of things about how this went, but the most important aspect was the outpouring of community support. 

“The ones that care, really care. It might sound cheesy, but it made our shining star shine brighter,” says Slocum. 

Especially in Northern Michigan, our shining star is community; and our local community keeps Beards (and other small businesses) afloat in non-tourist months. Even amidst a pandemic, many of our pub regulars who could no longer belly up to our bar showed up for their Beards food and beer. And with everyone restricted from gathering together, it was nice to see familiar faces, even if it was through a car window. 

Meanwhile, behind the scenes our owners strived to keep up with the constant updates to unemployment, the Payment Protection Program (PPP), and any and all health and safety bulletins. Planning for the month turned into adjusting plans daily to adapt to new regulations. Is there a right way? A wrong way? Support, grants, and regulations have been primarily reactive, with too many agencies being caught off guard to paint a clear picture. For instance, the PPP fast-tracked money to small businesses to aid operations and payroll, but only after the funds had been dispersed were tutorials and guidelines provided to business owners. 

covid-19

“It [PPP] got cash in people’s hands quickly, but not knowing how to utilize it has been tough.” says Manthei. 

Because of Beards’ seasonality—meaning a majority of our business comes from the summer months—we are ultimately hoping the PPP can slow down any backslide we have to endure over the next six months of not being open to our full capacity. And in true Beards’ spirit, we are making it work. 

To us at Beards, making it work means we thought very seriously about whether or not to open our dine-in service Memorial Day weekend following Governor Whitmer’s announcement. With only four days between the announcement and the weekend, we decided it was not enough time to finish our construction projects or ensure quality of service and safety to both our customers and staff. 

“How do we provide a level of service while distancing? How do we provide a fun experience while wearing masks?” asks Manthei.

We were not the only ones to remain closed, but there were other businesses who did open their doors. 

Like many other businesses, we asked around about what was working, how customers were reacting, and how to keep everyone comfortable while still maintaining the safety requirements. Admittedly, the world seemed to be all over the spectrum. While some reopened establishments operated with clear COVID-19 signage and traffic flow to steer customers into staying cautious, others were completely denying the restrictions by seemingly not caring at all that large groups, many of whom who were unmasked, were gathering in their spaces. 

covid-19

It was a careful experiment on our end. At first our management team used signage, red floor arrows, and trained staff to direct and inform our customers on how to move about our space. We quickly realized that absolutely no one looked at the floor no matter how obvious the arrows were, so we got rid of those by the end of the week, using our staff instead to guide customers around our space to abide by safe social distancing rules. 

When it came to mask wearing, we very clearly demanded that upon entering and moving about the pub, customers were to wear masks at all times. When seated, customers are allowed to de-mask and enjoy their meal and full experience. And most customers have been abiding by this practice with grace and understanding; however, there have been a few colorful stand-outs in opposition. They did not stay at Beards Brewery for long as their attitudes and disregard for the safety of our staff and other customers was not welcome. Staff, I must note, are wearing masks during their entire shifts whether they work as front of the house or back of the house workers, only taking them off to hydrate or eat their meals on their breaks from the safety of our break room. 

Northern Michigan has always been a haven for Michiganders and other visitors—a place to get away, to breathe fresh air, relax, and come together. For many, Northern Michigan has been an escape from COVID-19. Our population size and the amount of open space we have has made our region safer than most. But this does not mean we are invulnerable, so while we have our usual summer influx of tourism and vacationers, we will still be here, but it will be on our terms. 

Looking to other regions of the state, and other bars and restaurants tackling the same issues we are, it all seems like an experiment. Truthfully, it’s frightening for many reasons. No one wants another surge in positive COVID-19 cases to happen, obviously, but outside health and safety, a lot of establishments are asking themselves—can we make enough money at 50% capacity to justify opening? Some of my staff will not return to work—is it because of fear or because unemployment is more lucrative? My space is small and narrow—how do I direct traffic inside my space safely? What will my business plan look like next year? Will my business still be here next year? 

These are all fears. Some are short term problems and some we will only begin to see in the next six months. The survival of hospitality will not rely on the customers’ need to go out to dinner; rather, it will survive because ownership and management will have made the right decisions. 

At Beards, we have had to cut back our menu offerings as well as our hours in order to keep our present staff healthy and safe while trying to avoid over-work. And although we have hiring challenges every summer due to the huge need, it is more difficult this year with many people still staying at home and not working. Our staff have also become multi-taskers—every staffer has been trained to work almost every position at our pub in order to fulfill ease of scheduling and protocol. We have waiters working in the back of the house slinging pizzas. We have hosts manning the dishwasher. We have our sales representative chopping, pressing, fetching, catching, and helping a little bit everywhere. And everyone busses tables. It is truly a team effort. 

Outside our home pub in Petoskey, our sales market has been a similar story on a larger scale. 

After bars and restaurants closed dine-in service in March, the majority of the traditional sales rep. job description disappeared. Spring and summer festivals were cancelled one after the other. Draft sales dropped to nothing. Besides pivoting to kitchen work and other odd jobs to support the brewery, sales reps like myself had to get creative. We rely heavily on face-to-face communication in the craft beer industry—it’s all about establishing and maintaining the relationship with buyers and accounts. 

But when do we go back into the market now that the state is opening again? When is it safe to visit other businesses and actually interact—to reconnect those important relationships? How do you measure personal safety on one hand and the success of a business on the other? Because, while beer is not an essential product to actually survive as a human being, it is the lifeblood of over 400 small businesses in the state of Michigan. 

I can say that the Michigan brewery sales representatives know each other pretty well; in fact, we prefer to help each other out and many of us have close friendships outside of work. Because of this, all of us reps have been debating the above questions for the last three months. We normally operate with calendars that have been scheduled with travel, lodging, events, and sales strategy one, two, three months ahead at a time. We are go-go-go, always-on-the-move people. Now, we are planning week-by-week, twiddling our thumbs and getting used to being the most sedentary we have ever been. Communication and connecting has been challenging as well, and we are taking our cues from distributors and accounts directly to see what they are comfortable with. Personally, I have tried a bit of everything—emails, texts, phone calls, Zoom meetings, and even custom ‘Hello, hope you’re swell’ Beards postcards. Recently, I have dipped my toe back into the market in Beards’ hometown by visiting neighboring businesses and dropping off samples. It has all been fine, but it has changed so much. A conversational pleasantry is not just ‘Hello’ anymore, it’s “Are you okay with me coming in?”, “I’m wearing a mask, but where would you like me to stand and speak with you safely?”, “Can I hand you this product sheet?” It is clear that there is no universal policy for selling beer safely. It is on every individual rep’s shoulders to balance the responsibility of safety and doing their job. 

covid-19

But we are used to being flexible in the beer industry. The market changes and we adapt. This is just a bigger challenge than we ever expected, and who knew there was something bigger to battle than seltzer? Looking at this as an opportunity, the craft brewery industry in Michigan can and will survive this. 

Getting creative, becoming more flexible, and pushing business models forward will help sustain us here in the market as well as in the taproom. Beards is forging ahead and launching a monthly beer subscription ‘Milk Route,’ with subscribers receiving different Beards products throughout the month on a weekly basis. We also have products coming down the line that are newer avenues we are excited to pursue.  

COVID-19 has definitely been a challenge so far, but we can use it to expand upon our core principles of community, hospitality, and innovation—all while diversifying revenue. And since Michigan has always prided itself on buying and supporting local, we are confident we will have the support needed to make it through this pandemic. It will be another learning experience for all of us, but I think we can meet the challenge. After all, our consumers are not merely customers, they are enthusiasts. As much as we care about the product and the experience, so do they. 

 

solera

The foeder-aged ale utilizes a technique that blends old and young into an ever-evolving beer

 

Holland, Mich.  — New Holland Brewing Company has announced the next member of the Dragon’s Milk family, Dragon’s Milk Solera, a 10% ABV foeder-aged ale that emphasizes the passage of time. By implementing a method where a flow of fresh beer influences the base solera, Dragon’s Milk Solera achieves a drinking experience that’s simultaneously consistent and ever-changing.

soleraThe solera aging method could best be described as fractional blending. Beginning with a master batch, New Holland ages Dragon’s Milk Solera in massive oak foeders and gradually pulls down the line until reaching the final foeder, blending a pool of beer from different generations. The beer’s average age will increase before hitting an eventual equilibrium, becoming more layered and complex. Each pull from the solera will contain a small bit of the original batch, allowing Dragon’s Milk fans to follow this beer as it evolves.

“We plan to label each batch with the pull number so drinkers can join us on the journey,” Brand Manager Dominic Berquist said. “The aging and blending brings our brewers and cellarman a new set of challenges, but they have more than risen to the occasion and we’re very excited by the results.”

In a glass, Dragon’s Milk Solera presents a gorgeous mahogany hue. An oaky and subtly sweet nose draws the drinker in for a sip where beguiling flavors of caramel, toffee and fig coalesce into a beer best savored amongst good company. Crack open a couple with friends and watch the Dragon’s Milk legend unfold.

“We’ve researched the history and lore behind the term ‘Dragon’s Milk’ and have actually found references to it as early as the mid-1500s in England,” Bergquist said. “Dragon’s Milk was used to describe a wide variety of potent ales and elixirs that were worthy of celebration, and Solera absolutely lives up to that expectation. It’s an exciting new chapter in the legend of Dragon’s Milk and we can’t wait for our fans to try this brew.”

Dragon’s Milk Solera will be available year round in four-pack 12 oz bottles and on draft in select states beginning in August. A limited amount of this beer will be available for online pre-order starting at 11am on July 18. The release coincides with another New Holland brand, Hazy River, a one hundred percent Citra-hopped New England Style IPA with a huge citrus aroma and taste.

Pick up will take place at the Knickerbocker and New Holland production facility on Saturday, August 1 from 11-6pm. For more information on Dragon’s Milk Solera and the pre-order, please visit www.dragonsmilk.com.

 

About Dragon’s Milk

Throughout the ages, Dragon’s Milk has been a term used to describe potent ales and elixirs worthy of a celebration, a reward at the end of the journey. New Holland Brewing Co. is proud to continue that tradition today with the Dragon’s Milk family of brands. What began as a single barrel in the back of the brewhouse in 2001 has now become a line of legendary brews, including Dragon’s Milk Bourbon Barrel-Aged Stout, the #1 best selling stout in America. For more information, visit www.dragonsmilk.com or follow on Facebook and Instagram.

black is beautiful

COMSTOCK, Mich. – Bell’s Brewery is proud to announce that it has joined the Black is Beautiful initiative; an effort to help bring awareness to the injustices many people of color face daily.

The Black is Beautiful initiative originated with Marcus Baskerville, founder and head brewer at Weathered Souls Brewing based in San Antonio. Originally planned as a Weathered Souls-only release, Baskerville was encouraged to expand his reach and make the recipe and label artwork available to all.

“We all have some work to do, Bell’s included, and we are committed to that. It starts on an individual level. We all have a responsibility to do what we can to continue this conversation and help drive real change,” Larry Bell, president and founder of Bell’s Brewery said.

There are currently more than 700 breweries from across the globe committed to this initiative.

Bell’s version of the Weathered Souls Imperial Stout recipe will be released in 6-pack bottles exclusively at Bell’s General Store in downtown Kalamazoo and Upper Hand Brewery Taproom in August.

“Our mission is to bridge the gap that’s been around for ages and provide a platform to show that the brewing community is an inclusive place for everyone of any color. We are asking for all breweries and brewers far and wide to raise a glass with us in unison and participate in this collaboration,” a statement on the Black is Beautiful website reads.

As part of this initiative, Bell’s will make donations to two local Black-led organizations; the Kalamazoo NAACP and Face Off Theatre.

This collaboration brew, while sharing some of the same values, is not part of Bell’s Celebration Series. That series, which empowers different groups within the company that makes Bell’s what it is, will continue later this year with another beer designed and brewed by Bell’s employees.

That next release, which will come from and celebrate Bell’s Black and African American employees, will be released in the fall.

Previous brews have celebrated International Women’s Collaboration Brew Day, the LGBTQ+ community and veterans.

Additional details about Bell’s participation in the Black is Beautiful initiative will be announced as they become available on Bell’s website and social media channels: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram.

Upper Hand Brewery is a division of Bell’s Brewery, located in Escanaba, Michigan.

 

ABOUT BELL’S BREWERY

Bell’s Brewery, Inc. began in 1985 with a quest for better beer and a 15 gallon soup kettle. Since then, we’ve grown into a regional craft brewery that distributes to 41 states, in addition to Puerto Rico and Washington DC. The dedication to brewing flavorful, unfiltered, quality craft beers that started in 1985 is still with us today. We currently brew over 20 beers for distribution as well as many other small batch beers that are served at our pub in Kalamazoo, the Eccentric Cafe. Our ongoing goal is to brew thoughtfully, creatively and artistically. 100% family-owned and independent, we strive to bring an authentic and pleasant experience to all of our customers through our unique ales and lagers. For more information, please visit bellsbeer.com.

lake life seltzer

Cranberry Lime and White Peach Honey debut as first flavors

Holland, Mich. — Michigan’s proximity to fresh water is no secret, even the state’s name derives from the Ojibwa word mishigamaa, meaning large lake. For many Michiganders, lake means life, and now New Holland Spirits has introduced a line of hard seltzers that reinforces that philosophy. Lake Life Seltzers arrive in Michigan this May with Cranberry Lime and White Peach Honey debuting as the first flavors.

Crushable and clean, the seltzers deliver a welcome switch up for when the palate needs a break from craft beer. Brand Manager Adam Dickerson believes the new products will fit perfectly into the coastal lifestyle.

“Lake Life embodies the idea of letting loose,” Dickerson said. “Unplugging from the daily grind to step back and enjoy the weekend, the day or even just a moment of carefree vibes.”

lake life seltzerMade with Lake Life Vodka and fruit flavors, the two new seltzers allow you to drink by the lake without the hassle of extra ingredients or supplies—a cooler and some ice will do. The house-distilled vodka is what truly separates this seltzer from the pack. Lake Life Vodka launched in 2019, inspired by Michigan’s West Coast and savored moments spent on the water. Flavorwise, the spirit is smooth and subtly sweet, providing the perfect base to build a seltzer upon.

Head Distiller Brad Kamphuis sees the utility of both the spirit and the seltzer in different situations.

“If you enjoy mixing yourself a drink, Lake Life vodka has you covered, but we are stoked to be able to offer the ease of a ready-made beverage with Lake Life Seltzers,” Kamphuis said. “Both recipes are refreshing, crisp and balanced with just the right amount of fruit flavor.”

The boon for those watching their beer bellies: Lake Life Seltzer contains just 80 calories and less than 1 gram of sugar. They’re a guilt-free alcoholic alternative and gluten free to boot.

Carefully crafted near the shores of Lake Michigan by New Holland Spirits in Holland, Lake Life reflects a connection between spirit and season.

“Whether you are relaxed in an adirondack chair, dipping your toes in the water or doing cannonball off the raft, these are the moments that we look forward to all year,” Dickerson said.

This summer, pair these moments with Lake Life and let’s coast.

 

About New Holland Spirits
In early 2002, New Holland Brewing Co-Founder & President, Brett VanderKamp visited the Caribbean with the intention of enjoying sun, sand and waves. Instead, he found world-class rum, and a lifelong obsession with fine craft spirits was born. He returned to Holland, MI with a mission; to create spirits that live up to his artful way of life and to share them with the world. For more information, visit their website or follow on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram

believe in beer

‘Believe in Beer’ Donations and applications for breweries in need accepted now through May 17 

 

Boulder, Colo. — The Brewers Association (BA)—the trade association representing small and independent American craft brewers—has partnered with Bottleshare—a fundraising nonprofit dedicated to the craft beverage community—to create the Believe in Beer Fund to support breweries and state brewers guilds impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. The fund is open for breweries and guilds from across the country to apply for immediate financial assistance for operational expenses such as payroll, rent, and utilities.

According to a poll conducted by the Brewers Association earlier this month, independent craft breweries have been severely impacted by COVID-19, as evidenced by a sharp drop in craft category sales, massive furloughs or layoffs, and the high likelihood of a large number of brewery closures while under social distancing mandates. A majority of breweries do not think their business can last three months given current conditions.

“This is a very challenging time for breweries and their livelihoods are at risk. We hope creating this relief fund with Bottleshare will provide an answer to the most common question beer lovers have been asking during this unprecedented time: ‘How can I help?’” said Bob Pease, president and CEO, Brewers Association. “The craft beer community is rooted in collaboration and philanthropy, and now is our chance to come together and give back to our most vulnerable breweries.”

Beginning today through the end of American Craft Beer Week® on May 17, beer lovers can contribute to the fund by visiting charity.gofundme.com/believe-in-beer-relief-fund. Relief funds will be available to breweries and state guilds that demonstrate immediate financial need due to COVID-19 and meet the outlined criteria. Those in need can find more information at https://www.thebottleshare.org/breweries-and-guilds and apply for a grant at https://www.thebottleshare.org/grant-application. Bottleshare will review applications and select recipients based on need.

“Bottleshare was created to support industry workers and their families when they experience hardships,” said Christopher Glenn, founder of Bottleshare. “During this uncertain time, when support is needed more than ever, we’re proud to join efforts with the Brewers Association to reciprocate the love and strength that characterize the craft beer community and help the breweries that make it so special.”

For more information on the Believe in Beer Fund, please visit https://www.thebottleshare.org/breweries-and-guilds. Images available for download here.

The Brewers Association has also created a Coronavirus Resource Center to provide small and independent craft brewers with an evolving collection of resources to help weather the storm. All Brewers Association-authored resources relating to COVID-19 are available for free to both members and nonmembers.

 

About the Brewers Association

The Brewers Association (BA) is the not-for-profit trade association dedicated to small and independent American brewers, their beers and the community of brewing enthusiasts. The BA represents 5,400-plus U.S. breweries. The BA’s independent craft brewer seal is a widely adopted symbol that differentiates beers by small and independent craft brewers. The BA organizes events including the World Beer Cup®Great American Beer Festival®Craft Brewers Conference® & BrewExpo America®SAVOR™: An American Craft Beer & Food ExperienceHomebrew Con™National Homebrew Competition and American Craft Beer Week®. The BA publishes The New Brewer® magazine, and Brewers Publications® is the leading publisher of brewing literature in the U.S. Beer lovers are invited to learn more about the dynamic world of craft beer at CraftBeer.com® and about homebrewing via the BA’s American Homebrewers Association® and the free Brew Guru® mobile app. Follow us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

The Brewers Association is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, or marital/familial status. The BA complies with provisions of Executive Order 11246 and the rules, regulations, and relevant orders of the Secretary of Labor.

About Bottleshare

Bottleshare is a fundraising and fund distribution nonprofit organization for the craft beverage industry. The group raises money through various collaborations and partnerships within the community, and the generous support of donors and sponsors. Bottleshare then grants emergency financial assistance to brewery, winery, and distillery workers who have experienced extreme hardships outside of the workplace preventing them from working and producing an income.

To learn more about Bottleshare visit www.thebottleshare.org and follow on social media @bottleshareofficial.

hand sanitizer

Grand Rapids distillery has converted from producing craft spirits to Michigan-made hand sanitizer

 

Grand Rapids, Michigan – Over the course of the last month, Long Road Distillers has shifted from producing Michigan-made craft spirits to Michigan-made hand sanitizer in order to help meet the tremendous needs of the community during the current outbreak. To help speed up the process, the Grand Rapids distillery has partnered with several Michigan breweries to provide beer that can be distilled and converted into ethyl alcohol, the primary ingredient in hand sanitizer.

“We have all of the equipment on site to produce hand sanitizer from scratch,” said Jon O’Connor, co-owner of Long Road Distillers. “Our two large stills allow us to take fermented grain or fruit and turn it into 190 proof neutral spirit, much like we do in the process of producing our vodka.”

For Long Road, the pinch point in speeding up production is fermentation capacity. To overcome that roadblock, they are now working with several Michigan breweries who are providing beer that can be run through the still. To date, Long Road has partnered with The Mitten Brewing Company, Founders Brewing Company, Perrin Brewing Company and Shorts Brewing Company. Some of the beer had been kegged for restaurant use, while some was brewed by the companies specifically for the purpose of distilling into sanitizer.

hand sanitizer

“The craft beverage world has always been about creativity, excellence and service,” said Chris Andrus, co-owner of The Mitten Brewing Company. “This effort is just a natural extension of that; quickly working together to solve problems and meet a need in our community.”

So far, Long Road Distillers has worked with nearly 300 health care providers, nursing homes, grocers, social service agencies and other essential businesses to provide sanitizer to keep patients, residents, employees and customers safe. Their ability to offer this is due in large part to those who have come to the support of the distillery at this time.

“We’re fortunate to have such a collaborative beverage community in Michigan!” exclaimed Kyle VanStrien, co-owner of Long Road Distillers. “The willingness of our friends to step up and help us in this effort has certainly been one of the brightest silver linings during these difficult days.”

Long Road Hand Sanitizer is available for purchase in individual spray bottles and in bulk refill jugs, with primary focus given to front-line providers and essential businesses and their employees at this time. Interested organizations may submit inquiries about procuring sanitizer through Long Road’s website: www.LongRoadDistillers.com/handsanitizer/

A limited number of individual spray bottles are being sold to the public through the distillery’s weekly take-out service, and orders must be placed in advance through the takeout link on their website. Pick-up of sanitizer, as well as cocktail kits and bottles-to-go are offered Thursdays (12-5p) and Fridays (12-6p) in Grand Rapids, and Saturdays (10a-2p) from their Grand Haven location. Long Road Hand Sanitizer can also be found at several local retailers.

About Long Road Distillers:

Long Road Distillers was born from the belief that making world-class spirits means never taking shortcuts along the way. After becoming the first craft distillery in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Long Road Distillers formed relationships with local farmers to bring that mission to Grand Rapids’ West Side neighborhood. Each spirit produced at Long Road Distillers is milled from locally sourced ingredients, fermented, and distilled on-site. The result is an uncompromised lineup of spirits including Vodka, Gin, Whisky and more. Their spirits, along with a handcrafted collection of cocktails and a wide variety of food can be enjoyed at their Grand Rapids and Grand Haven Tasting Rooms, and visitors can enjoy samples of their spirits and purchase merchandise and bottles to-go at their Boyne City Tasting Room.  For more information, visit www.LongRoadDistillers.com or find Long Road Distillers on Facebook or Instagram @longroadgr.