Style: Session India Style Black Lager
ABV: 4.0%
IBU: 60
Aroma: Oddly enough, my first thought when taking in the aroma of this beer is simply “beer.” In quite a nice way, this beer’s aroma is by no means flashy, overwhelming, or intense. Its foremost characteristic thus far is a simple, clean yeast character, followed by sublte hop citrus and caramel malts. No complaints here.
Appearance: Nightwheeler pours as black as it sounds, with a surprisingly dense, lingering tan head. This is certainly an appearance I would’ve expected from much bigger, imperial stouts, but Nightwheeler looks to be full of surprises so far. Additionally, my glass is developing a near-perfect lacing as the beer goes down.
Taste: There is an interesting crispness about this beer’s roast character. Generally, dark and roasty beers present themselves as sweet and full-bodied, but Nightwheeler has found a new approach. The roast character is thin and bright, but does not come across as harsh or tannic. After the roast character has presented itself, the hop citrus and bitterness takes over the remainder of the taste of this beer. The hop character is not overly forward, and works gently with the roast character provide its refreshing crispness, and comes through vaguely like a chocolate covered orange.
Mouthfeel: Due to the beer’s lighter body, there is a very slight stickiness from residual sugars, but that’s nothing I wouldn’t expect form a beer this dark. The beer’s dense head feels creamy across the tongue, which is quite nice. The medium-high carbonation helps the beer develop its creaminess as it’s pulled onto the tongue.
Aftertaste: Arguably, this beer seems more like it looks in the aftertaste. Notes of toffee and caramel are rather apparent, and a bit of hop spiciness helps this beer feel more akin to baked goods. Further down the line in the finish, the beer presents its more distinctive, American hop character. There are small notes of grapefruit rind and pine that finish the beer of quite nicely.
Overall: I knew I wanted something session-strength, but I wasn’t feeling anything hop-forward. However, nothing else struck my fancy, and the first beer I selected got what could only be described as “dirty looks” from the cashier. Having now received the cashier’s approval, I headed home to pop the top.
Initially, I wasn’t impressed, but by no means was I disappointed. There are no surprises here, and nothing life-changing about it, but perhaps this beer is perfect for the tail end of this this record-breaking November snowstorm. Nightwheeler is certainly worth grabbing a sixer of while it’s on the shelves, just as long as you’re not expecting pyrotechnics upon decanting.

Style: Session India Style Black Lager
ABV: 4.0%
IBU: 60

Aroma: Oddly enough, my first thought when taking in the aroma of this beer is simply “beer.” In quite a nice way, this beer’s aroma is by no means flashy, overwhelming, or intense. Its foremost characteristic thus far is a simple, clean yeast character, followed by sublte hop citrus and caramel malts. No complaints here.

Appearance: Nightwheeler pours as black as it sounds, with a surprisingly dense, lingering tan head. This is certainly an appearance I would’ve expected from much bigger, imperial stouts, but Nightwheeler looks to be full of surprises so far. Additionally, my glass is developing a near-perfect lacing as the beer goes down.

Taste: There is an interesting crispness about this beer’s roast character. Generally, dark and roasty beers present themselves as sweet and full-bodied, but Nightwheeler has found a new approach. The roast character is thin and bright, but does not come across as harsh or tannic. After the roast character has presented itself, the hop citrus and bitterness takes over the remainder of the taste of this beer. The hop character is not overly forward, and works gently with the roast character provide its refreshing crispness, and comes through vaguely like a chocolate covered orange.

Mouthfeel: Due to the beer’s lighter body, there is a very slight stickiness from residual sugars, but that’s nothing I wouldn’t expect form a beer this dark. The beer’s dense head feels creamy across the tongue, which is quite nice. The medium-high carbonation helps the beer develop its creaminess as it’s pulled onto the tongue.

Aftertaste: Arguably, this beer seems more like it looks in the aftertaste. Notes of toffee and caramel are rather apparent, and a bit of hop spiciness helps this beer feel more akin to baked goods. Further down the line in the finish, the beer presents its more distinctive, American hop character. There are small notes of grapefruit rind and pine that finish the beer of quite nicely.

Overall: I knew I wanted something session-strength, but I wasn’t feeling anything hop-forward. However, nothing else struck my fancy, and the first beer I selected got what could only be described as “dirty looks” from the cashier. Having now received the cashier’s approval, I headed home to pop the top.

Initially, I wasn’t impressed, but by no means was I disappointed. There are no surprises here, and nothing life-changing about it, but perhaps this beer is perfect for the tail end of this this record-breaking November snowstorm. Nightwheeler is certainly worth grabbing a sixer of while it’s on the shelves, just as long as you’re not expecting pyrotechnics upon decanting.

I don’t consider myself an expert on the subject of magic, but I have a few reasons to believe Perrin’s Production Manager — John Stewart — is most likely a wizard.

I got a few minutes to chat stone-cold beer nerdery with him, and regardless of having commercial brewing experience myself, he was still dropping information that was pretty far over my head. His experience at Saugatuck Brewing Company has clearly done him well.

Even before tasting his product, Stewart appears to be more than qualified to make high quality, commercial beer. His passion lies largely in quality control where he ensures through vigorous tests that every single keg or bottle is free of defects, and represents its style accurately. I tasted quite a few of Stewart’s beers, but here are a few highlights that made my list:

Bashtoberfest

3.9% ABV — The very first word I have written down in my tasting notes for this beer is, “solid.” And the beer is just that. At a rather sessionable ABV, Bashtoberfest brings a well balanced and clean lager yeast profile, soft caramel notes and a rather spicy hop character that is just a touch more forward than you might expect. If you’re looking to try to figure out what beer nerds mean when they say “spicy hop character,” this beer is a good place to start.

Das Braun Lager

5.3% ABV — When I asked Perrin partner Jarred Sper about some of his favorite beers on tap that day, it was evident that Das Braun Lager was at least the beer he enjoyed pronouncing the most (and rightfully so). This beer does a great job of using atypical beer ingredients in a shockingly subtle and pleasant way.

Stewart sifted through piles information on the smoked malts available to commercial brewers, and chose very carefully a malt variety that wouldn’t steal the show, or catch drinkers off guard. The resulting beer is a light-bodied beer balancing on a tightrope of flavor profiles. The oak-smoked malts present themselves as a distinctive spice character both on the nose and tongue. A soft yeast character and malt sweetness fall between a delicately smoked finish.

Beetle Juice

4.5% ABV — Brewed for the Halloween season, Stewart put together a beer that pours nearly blood red. Believe it or not, Stewart and some of the other brewers researched every practical red food coloring they could find and ended up choosing a dye extracted from the scales of the scales of certain varieties of beetles.

Although the beer is not technically vegetarian, Stewart found it to be the most flavor-neutral dye available. Fortunately there are no notes of blood or insects in this beer — only a forward and distinct cedar-like hop bitterness and aroma from generous hopping, and a delightful caramel background. Late in the finish there are subtle notes of dark fruits and toffee.

Gilda’s Cherry Saison

4.6% ABV — Gilda’s Cherry Saison is named after the Gilda’s Club of Grand Rapids, where one dollar from every pint of this beer is donated. The beer has a slight pink tint from the Michigan cherry and rose petal additions, which is rather appropriately timed for last month, which was Breast Cancer Awareness Month. A bready aroma tackles the nostrils first, followed quickly byslight cherry and lemon.

Gilda’s Cherry Saison is fantastically dry with a moderate Belgian floweriness. Just like Stewart’s approach with the smoked malts, there are no excessive cherry flavors present. The cherry blends well with the beer’s acidity and brightness, and most importantly, the beer lacks the medicinal character that is very often associated with cherry beers.

I don’t consider myself an expert on the subject of magic, but I have a few reasons to believe Perrin’s Production Manager — John Stewart — is most likely a wizard.
I got a few minutes to chat stone-cold beer nerdery with him, and regardless of having commercial brewing experience myself, he was still dropping information that was pretty far over my head. His experience at Saugatuck Brewing Company has clearly done him well.
Even before tasting his product, Stewart appears to be more than qualified to make high quality, commercial beer. His passion lies largely in quality control where he ensures through vigorous tests that every single keg or bottle is free of defects, and represents its style accurately. I tasted quite a few of Stewart’s beers, but here are a few highlights that made my list:

Bashtoberfest

3.9% ABV — The very first word I have written down in my tasting notes for this beer is, “solid.” And the beer is just that. At a rather sessionable ABV, Bashtoberfest brings a well balanced and clean lager yeast profile, soft caramel notes and a rather spicy hop character that is just a touch more forward than you might expect. If you’re looking to try to figure out what beer nerds mean when they say “spicy hop character,” this beer is a good place to start.

Das Braun Lager

5.3% ABV — When I asked Perrin partner Jarred Sper about some of his favorite beers on tap that day, it was evident that Das Braun Lager was at least the beer he enjoyed pronouncing the most (and rightfully so). This beer does a great job of using atypical beer ingredients in a shockingly subtle and pleasant way.
Stewart sifted through piles information on the smoked malts available to commercial brewers, and chose very carefully a malt variety that wouldn’t steal the show, or catch drinkers off guard. The resulting beer is a light-bodied beer balancing on a tightrope of flavor profiles. The oak-smoked malts present themselves as a distinctive spice character both on the nose and tongue. A soft yeast character and malt sweetness fall between a delicately smoked finish.

Beetle Juice

4.5% ABV — Brewed for the Halloween season, Stewart put together a beer that pours nearly blood red. Believe it or not, Stewart and some of the other brewers researched every practical red food coloring they could find and ended up choosing a dye extracted from the scales of the scales of certain varieties of beetles.
Although the beer is not technically vegetarian, Stewart found it to be the most flavor-neutral dye available. Fortunately there are no notes of blood or insects in this beer — only a forward and distinct cedar-like hop bitterness and aroma from generous hopping, and a delightful caramel background. Late in the finish there are subtle notes of dark fruits and toffee.

Gilda’s Cherry Saison

4.6% ABV — Gilda’s Cherry Saison is named after the Gilda’s Club of Grand Rapids, where one dollar from every pint of this beer is donated. The beer has a slight pink tint from the Michigan cherry and rose petal additions, which is rather appropriately timed for last month, which was Breast Cancer Awareness Month. A bready aroma tackles the nostrils first, followed quickly byslight cherry and lemon.
Gilda’s Cherry Saison is fantastically dry with a moderate Belgian floweriness. Just like Stewart’s approach with the smoked malts, there are no excessive cherry flavors present. The cherry blends well with the beer’s acidity and brightness, and most importantly, the beer lacks the medicinal character that is very often associated with cherry beers.

Style: Flanders Red Ale
ABV: 7%

Aroma: Fairly forward funkiness, leading with notes of tart cherry pie. The aroma is fairly typical of a Flanders red ale, only slightly cleaner and less complex, in a rather pleasing way.

Appearance: Dr. Lacto pours slightly golden amber, with a white head that doesn’t stick around too long. More than likely, barrel aging and souring bugs have ruined this beer’s chance for good head retention. However, I can’t say I’m all too concerned about that.

Taste: Nice, forward sourness is the first notable character. The “cherry pie” notes from the nose come through on the tongue in an even greater quantity, combined with some pineapple and dark fruits. At this point, the oak character is just shy of undetectable. Again, this beer is not overly complex, which is a quality that I can certainly appreciate in the realm of barrel-aged beers.

Mouthfeel: Although I typically try to avoid using the word, “effervescent” for the sake of retaining my non-beer-geek friends and loved ones, I might have to let it fly this time. A nice, champagne-like bubbliness that is perfectly appropriate for the style is forward and well calculated.

Aftertaste: In the finish, a bit of the oak character begins to show, but again, not very forward. It almost shows through as a vague mustiness (for lack of a better word), rather than barrel character. The acidity reaches its peak at the very beginning of the finish, and faintly lingers in on the sides of the tongue.

Overall: As for Perrin’s first sour bottle release, I think it’s extremely evident that they’ve stayed intensely focused on quality, and on producing a respectable version of the style. When I spoke with head brewer John Stewart about the beer, he mentioned a head-spinning amount of quality control and yeast lab work that they performed during the production of this beer, and quite frankly, a good portion of that info was well over my head. However, he did mention that the beer was aged for nearly a year and a half in third-use Woodford Reserve bourbon barrels, which explains the subtlety in the oak character.

There’s absolutely nothing to complain about here, which is significant for a style that can easily be rushed into a premature release, or even worse — a premature drain-pour. Sour beers in their early stages can often taste, smell and even look like the most un-drinkable vomit-water you could dream up.

However, over time sour beers will clean themselves up thanks to the work of various strains of bacteria and yeast. To make a (very) long story short, sour beers require intense patience and vast knowledge to understand if and when a sour beer will ever taste as great as beers like Dr. Lacto. Compliments to the brewer!

DETROIT – “This is amazing. I’m used to festivals with maybe 20 breweries, two of which are Budweiser or Miller.”

The guy speaking stood before me, dressed in a red ball cap and sweatshirt with a large “N,” denoting where he recently moved from — Nebraska. In contrast to his native Cornhusker State’s beer events, the festival we were at — the sixth annual Detroit Fall Beer Festival — sported more than 75 breweries serving nearly 700 beers, all of them from right here in Michigan.

It was a timely reminder of what Michigan craft beer lovers are sometimes tempted to take for granted: we are blessed with a large, diverse array of great local brews that is the envy of most any other state in the union. Here are a few of the more interesting ones I sampled over the festive weekend, including several that confounded my expectations.

Got Their Claws in Me

Apridisiac Sour Apricot Amber Ale, Bourbon Imperial Pumpkin Ale, Griffin Claw Brewing Co. (Birmingham)

Cool story, bro: last month I attended a beer dinner with Griffin Claw head brewer Dan Rogers, who told the story of how he transitioned from chef to brewer during his days in Las Vegas in the 1990s. It turns out I drank his beer at the now defunct Holy Cow Microbrewery during my one and only trip to Sin City in 1996. Happily for me and the rest of Michigan, Rogers is back home and turning out some amazing brews including Apridisiac, a hay-colored, medium-bodied ale that delivers sweet and sour apricot jam and marmalade notes with a mild funky finish. Of greatest surprise to me was how much I enjoyed Bourbon Imperial Pumpkin, which combined three of my least favorite fads into one beer.

Livin’ on the Edge

Ctrl+Alt+Del Altbier, River’s Edge Brewing Co. (Milford)

I have yet to make the trip to River’s Edge, which opened just this past summer, but the buzz around its beers has been consistently good. This is no doubt due to the shrewd decision to bring Michigan brewing veteran Kim Schneider (formerly of Traverse City’s North Peak, among others) on board as head brewer. Ctrl+Alt+Del is fashioned as a traditional Northern German altbier, with a light malt flavor, balanced nicely by Spalt hops and a crisp, satisfying finish. Not to mention, it has a great name.

Goodd Beerr

Bourbon Barrel Aged Vanilla Porter, Gonzo’s BiggDogg Brewing Co. (Kalamazoo)

Longtime brewer of both the home and pro variety Greg “Gonzo” Haner finally put his extensive Siebel Institute training to its ultimate use in 2013 when he opened Gonzo’s BiggDogg in Kalamazoo. Despite my reservations about the brewery’s silly name, the beers are top notch, especially the Bourbon Barrel Aged Vanilla Porter, a robust, chocolatey brew with vanilla notes highlighted by the bourbon character, all smoothed out with a pleasantly silky mouthfeel.

Gravitas

440 Pepper Smoker, Barrel Aged Rye-Headed Stepchild, Original Gravity Brewing Co. (Milan)

The first time I had 440 Pepper Smoker on tap, I knew I had finally found a pepper-flavored beer I could get behind. The toasty amber malt notes are accentuated with just enough jalapeno heat to leave you with a slow burn and a thirst for another pint. The Rye-Headed Stepchild brought a brilliant balance of ginger and rye malt spiciness, overlaid with complex, woody notes from the whiskey barrel.

Hops and Oats

Oats ’N Hoes Imperial IPA, Unruly Brewing Co. (Muskegon)

Another surprise for me was Oats ’N Hoes, an imperial IPA from relative newcomer Unruly Brewing, the brainchild of homebrewer-turned-pro Eric Hoffman. Hoffman’s known for brewing beers with copious amounts of hops, and this rendition of the 8.1% ABV bitter bomb was all the more hoppy for being pushed through a Randall of, if memory serves, fresh Chinook and Simcoe cones. The malt backbone (which included flaked oats) held up nicely against even this much hoppiness. I’m not normally a fan of these types of beers (or even Simcoe hops in general), but this one managed to hit the spot. The name is apparently a reference to a rap parody by Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly that I’m not hip (hop) enough to have seen.

Beer Garden

Dandelion Rhubarb Saison, Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales (Dexter)

Head brewer and founder Ron Jeffries of Jolly Pumpkin is known both for making some pretty funktastic wild ales as well as experimenting with various leafy green ingredients. His Dandelion Rhubarb Saison featured the well known Jolly Pumpkin sour profile, but topped it off with a counterbalance of earthy, vegetal notes. Dee-licious and gone too soon.

The Ones That Got Away

Two beers I wanted to try included Brewery Vivant’s Paris — a saison fermented with brettanomyces and aged in red wine barrels — and Bourbon Barrel Territorial Baltic Porter — a collaboration between Liberty Street and Witch’s Hat, named for a road that runs between Plymouth and South Lyon, where the two breweries are respectively located. A number of people enthusiastically recommended these beers, but I never quite got to them. Sad face.

There were, of course, many other amazing beers deserving of mention. But just like beer festivals, where time is limited, so is the word count for articles recapping them.

In the meantime, get ready for the next great Michigan Brewers Guild fest, the 10th annual Winter Beer Festival, now two days long — Feb. 27-28, 2015 — in Grand Rapids.  Tickets go on sale Dec. 4 (with pre-sale for Enthusiast members Dec. 2-3). See mibeer.com to buy online.

DETROIT – “This is amazing. I’m used to festivals with maybe 20 breweries, two of which are Budweiser or Miller.”
The guy speaking stood before me, dressed in a red ball cap and sweatshirt with a large “N,” denoting where he recently moved from — Nebraska. In contrast to his native Cornhusker State’s beer events, the festival we were at — the sixth annual Detroit Fall Beer Festival — sported more than 75 breweries serving nearly 700 beers, all of them from right here in Michigan.
It was a timely reminder of what Michigan craft beer lovers are sometimes tempted to take for granted: we are blessed with a large, diverse array of great local brews that is the envy of most any other state in the union. Here are a few of the more interesting ones I sampled over the festive weekend, including several that confounded my expectations.

Got Their Claws in Me

Apridisiac Sour Apricot Amber Ale, Bourbon Imperial Pumpkin Ale, Griffin Claw Brewing Co. (Birmingham)
Cool story, bro: last month I attended a beer dinner with Griffin Claw head brewer Dan Rogers, who told the story of how he transitioned from chef to brewer during his days in Las Vegas in the 1990s. It turns out I drank his beer at the now defunct Holy Cow Microbrewery during my one and only trip to Sin City in 1996. Happily for me and the rest of Michigan, Rogers is back home and turning out some amazing brews including Apridisiac, a hay-colored, medium-bodied ale that delivers sweet and sour apricot jam and marmalade notes with a mild funky finish. Of greatest surprise to me was how much I enjoyed Bourbon Imperial Pumpkin, which combined three of my least favorite fads into one beer.

Livin’ on the Edge

Ctrl+Alt+Del Altbier, River’s Edge Brewing Co. (Milford)
I have yet to make the trip to River’s Edge, which opened just this past summer, but the buzz around its beers has been consistently good. This is no doubt due to the shrewd decision to bring Michigan brewing veteran Kim Schneider (formerly of Traverse City’s North Peak, among others) on board as head brewer. Ctrl+Alt+Del is fashioned as a traditional Northern German altbier, with a light malt flavor, balanced nicely by Spalt hops and a crisp, satisfying finish. Not to mention, it has a great name.

Goodd Beerr

Bourbon Barrel Aged Vanilla Porter, Gonzo’s BiggDogg Brewing Co. (Kalamazoo)
Longtime brewer of both the home and pro variety Greg “Gonzo” Haner finally put his extensive Siebel Institute training to its ultimate use in 2013 when he opened Gonzo’s BiggDogg in Kalamazoo. Despite my reservations about the brewery’s silly name, the beers are top notch, especially the Bourbon Barrel Aged Vanilla Porter, a robust, chocolatey brew with vanilla notes highlighted by the bourbon character, all smoothed out with a pleasantly silky mouthfeel.

Gravitas

440 Pepper Smoker, Barrel Aged Rye-Headed Stepchild, Original Gravity Brewing Co. (Milan)
The first time I had 440 Pepper Smoker on tap, I knew I had finally found a pepper-flavored beer I could get behind. The toasty amber malt notes are accentuated with just enough jalapeno heat to leave you with a slow burn and a thirst for another pint. The Rye-Headed Stepchild brought a brilliant balance of ginger and rye malt spiciness, overlaid with complex, woody notes from the whiskey barrel.

Hops and Oats

Oats ’N Hoes Imperial IPA, Unruly Brewing Co. (Muskegon)
Another surprise for me was Oats ’N Hoes, an imperial IPA from relative newcomer Unruly Brewing, the brainchild of homebrewer-turned-pro Eric Hoffman. Hoffman’s known for brewing beers with copious amounts of hops, and this rendition of the 8.1% ABV bitter bomb was all the more hoppy for being pushed through a Randall of, if memory serves, fresh Chinook and Simcoe cones. The malt backbone (which included flaked oats) held up nicely against even this much hoppiness. I’m not normally a fan of these types of beers (or even Simcoe hops in general), but this one managed to hit the spot. The name is apparently a reference to a rap parody by Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly that I’m not hip (hop) enough to have seen.

Beer Garden

Dandelion Rhubarb Saison, Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales (Dexter)
Head brewer and founder Ron Jeffries of Jolly Pumpkin is known both for making some pretty funktastic wild ales as well as experimenting with various leafy green ingredients. His Dandelion Rhubarb Saison featured the well known Jolly Pumpkin sour profile, but topped it off with a counterbalance of earthy, vegetal notes. Dee-licious and gone too soon.

The Ones That Got Away

Two beers I wanted to try included Brewery Vivant’s Paris — a saison fermented with brettanomyces and aged in red wine barrels — and Bourbon Barrel Territorial Baltic Porter — a collaboration between Liberty Street and Witch’s Hat, named for a road that runs between Plymouth and South Lyon, where the two breweries are respectively located. A number of people enthusiastically recommended these beers, but I never quite got to them. Sad face.
There were, of course, many other amazing beers deserving of mention. But just like beer festivals, where time is limited, so is the word count for articles recapping them.
In the meantime, get ready for the next great Michigan Brewers Guild fest, the 10th annual Winter Beer Festival, now two days long — Feb. 27-28, 2015 — in Grand Rapids.  Tickets go on sale Dec. 4 (with pre-sale for Enthusiast members Dec. 2-3). See mibeer.com to buy online.

Style: Specialty stout
ABV: 6.1%
Glassware: Snifter

Aroma: Slightly boozy, with rich caramel sweetness and a pleasant fresh grain character. Subtle dark fruits are highlighted on the tail end of the aroma. Instantly, the beer is outwardly complex.

Appearance: Dark, with a nice light brown head. The head pours thick at first, and dwindles down to a few wispy patterns across the top of the beer. My snifter had a spotty lacing down the side of the glass.

Taste: Fairly roast forward with some good cocoa and rich dessert-like sweetness. The beer is vaguely reminiscent of chocolate cake, in a way that is pleasant and not overbearing. All these flavors become more vibrant as the beer warms up, and the roast character seems to build on itself through the duration of the pour.

Mouthfeel: Slightly sticky, but certainily not unpleasant. The carbonation level is moderately still, which works nicely to support the richness and provide a perceived sweetness on top to of the sweetness that is physically there.

Aftertaste: There is a lingering sweetness and roast character that feels a little bit like the finish on a nice, foamy latte.

Overall: The Special Double Cream Stout is quite a refreshing beer, not in the sense of taste, but rather in its concept. You can think of it like a session imperial stout — at a glance, it’s big, rich, roasty and can easily be mistaken for a hearty stout. However, at 6.1% ABV, you can move on with your evening, just as if you had drank something a littler easier on the liver.

This makes for a pretty fantastic fall seasonal — it delivers all the nice “warming” characteristics of a big stout, but you’ll still be able to drive home at the end of the evening.

Although this beer isn’t quite a “session” beer, I still may just go ahead and group it in because it certainly uses a lot of ideas that brewers draw on when designing a session ale. The trick is to create the illusion of a beer with a much fuller body than what is physically present, with the primary goal being a dramatically lowered ABV. If all we wanted was more beer and less drunk, we could all grab a tall-boy of our favorite domestic trash-lager at 3.8% ABV, but there’s a reason we don’t.

Many beer drinkers of today want the same thing, no matter the beer style — fuller flavor and deeper complexity. The session ale allows us to have more of those beers without making an ass of ourselves (as early in the evening). I believe I can speak for many of us when I say that this is a rather important quality in the beers that we choose!