Innovation is a driving force in the craft beer industry. Brewers push the boundaries of what a beer can be with new flavors, new ingredients and new techniques. But innovative changes aren’t just found in how a beer tastes, they’re also found in how it’s packaged. If you love bringing home your favorite beers from your favorite breweries, it may be time to say “goodbye” to the growler, and “hello” to the Crowler, the newest innovation in take-out beer.

The Crowler is a one-use, recyclable 32-ounce can that is filled and seamed right at the bar. The can is sealed air-tight by a modified canning machine developed by Colorado-based Oskar Blues Brewery and its partner, Ball Corporation. Oskar Blues is the exclusive distributor of the Crowler machine, a logical extension of the brewery’s pro-can philosophy.

“We’re really big fans of cans and all the advantages of cans,” said Jeremy Rudolf, Production Manager. Those advantages include recyclability, an air-tight seal that preserves carbonation and an opaque package that keeps sunlight out. It is also cleaner than your usual growler.

“Growlers come from all these people who just empty their beer, rinse them out and throw them in the car and just grab them when they need to. That doesn’t do the beer any favors,” said Rudolf.

Bill White, owner of White Flame Brewing Company in Hudsonville, was the first brewer in Michigan to offer Crowlers. He was a believer from the first time he saw it.

“My wife and I participated in a festival in Chicago last summer. Someone popped open a cooler with these quart-sized beer cans in it and I was amazed. When we returned that week I looked it up and said, ‘How do I get one?’”

In just a couple of months, a Crowler machine was purchased, and White Flame patrons were introduced to the newest way to get craft beer on-the-go.

“It’s been a huge boost for to-go sales, for sure,” claimed White. “It’s more portable than the growler.  For us, going forward, we’re going to try to push the can package.”

The Crowler machine is a modified food-canning system for the home that’s small enough to fit on the counter behind the bar.

“We took an existing machine, and we kind of pulled the machine apart and built it back up and evolved it over the last year and made many improvements for these custom cans,” said Rudolf.  The machine also includes a CO2 purging station that removes any oxygen from the can before it’s filled with beer.

Oskar Blues has sold over 200 Crowler machines around the globe, including White Flame and Perrin Brewing Company, which Oskar Blues acquired in March.

The Perrin Crowlers have been well received by both novice and savvy clientele. Bobby Klene of Indianapolis was at Perrin on a brewery tour with his wife when he noticed the new, canned take-out option.

“I was excited when I came in and saw they had the Crowlers. The first thing I thought in my head was, ‘I’m getting that!’” Beer aficionados like Klene are also anxious to spread the Crowler gospel. “Oh yeah, it’s getting put on Twitter tonight…there’s no question about that,” said Klene.

Chris Keskitalo of Grand Rapids had never heard of the Crowler, but had just made his first purchase and was already sold on its merits.

“I bought this because I’ve never had it before.  It seems easier for coolers, and you can just recycle it on your trip to the beach,” Keskitalo said.

In addition to White Flame and Perrin, Crowlers are also becoming popular at several other Michigan breweries and bars, including Griffin Claw Brew Company (Birmingham) and BFD Clubhouse in Detroit.

[tw-parallax image=”https://mittenbrew.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Masthead_Crowler-13.jpg” target=”self” lightbox=”no” ][/tw-parallax]

Even though the Crowler is generating buzz, growlers are still extremely popular, and not all beer drinkers will be ready for a switch. But for Bill White, the benefits of the increased shelf-life is a huge selling point.

“I’ve had them months and months later and they’ve still been great,” White said.

The combination of a longer life and a smaller volume has beer lovers like Klene favoring the Crowler.

“The moment you crack open a 64-ounce growler you have a time limit on when you can actually finish that and get the same quality product out of it,” Klene said.

Perrin customer Travis Andresen of Grand Rapids also sees a hidden benefit to the smaller 32-ounce can.

“It eliminates the sharing responsibilities because it’s just in one can, so I get it all to myself,” he joked.

Jeremy Rudolf from Oskar Blues does concede one possible drawback of the Crowler, and that’s the environmental concerns from using a new package for every purchase. But he believes those concerns can be answered as well.

“The one drawback of the whole thing is that it’s a one-way package. Now, the benefit of a one-way package is that it’s clean and it’s new every time. And it is infinitely recyclable. As long as you’re not a jerk and [you] throw it in the recycling bin, that will become a new can in less than two months.”

Beer lovers are always game to try the latest, greatest flavor innovation. Will that same attitude apply to the Crowler as well? Only time will tell. But these big, shiny cans may be making an appearance at your favorite brewery very soon.

To learn more about the Crowler, check out the Oskar Blues website.

Gravel Bottom Craft Brewery
3 replies

Comments are closed.